Hook 256-color support in configure.
[dana/urxvt.git] / doc / rxvt.7.pod
1 =head1 NAME
2
3 RXVT REFERENCE - FAQ, command sequences and other background information
4
5 =head1 SYNOPSIS
6
7    # set a new font set
8    printf '\33]50;%s\007' 9x15,xft:Kochi" Mincho"
9
10    # change the locale and tell rxvt-unicode about it
11    export LC_CTYPE=ja_JP.EUC-JP; printf "\33]701;$LC_CTYPE\007"
12
13    # set window title
14    printf '\33]2;%s\007' "new window title"
15
16 =head1 DESCRIPTION
17
18 This document contains the FAQ, the RXVT TECHNICAL REFERENCE documenting
19 all escape sequences, and other background information.
20
21 The newest version of this document is also available on the World Wide Web at
22 L<http://pod.tst.eu/http://cvs.schmorp.de/rxvt-unicode/doc/rxvt.7.pod>.
23
24 The main manual page for @@RXVT_NAME@@ itself is available at
25 L<http://pod.tst.eu/http://cvs.schmorp.de/rxvt-unicode/doc/rxvt.1.pod>.
26
27 =head1 RXVT-UNICODE/URXVT FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS
28
29
30 =head2 Meta, Features & Commandline Issues
31
32 =head3 My question isn't answered here, can I ask a human?
33
34 Before sending me mail, you could go to IRC: C<irc.freenode.net>,
35 channel C<#rxvt-unicode> has some rxvt-unicode enthusiasts that might be
36 interested in learning about new and exciting problems (but not FAQs :).
37
38 =head3 I use Gentoo, and I have a problem...
39
40 There are three big problems with Gentoo Linux: first of all, most if not
41 all Gentoo systems are completely broken (missing or mismatched header
42 files, broken compiler etc. are just the tip of the iceberg); secondly,
43 the Gentoo maintainer thinks it is a good idea to add broken patches to
44 the code; and lastly, it should be called Gentoo GNU/Linux.
45
46 For these reasons, it is impossible to support rxvt-unicode on
47 Gentoo. Problems appearing on Gentoo systems will usually simply be
48 ignored unless they can be reproduced on non-Gentoo systems.
49
50 =head3 Does it support tabs, can I have a tabbed rxvt-unicode?
51
52 Beginning with version 7.3, there is a perl extension that implements a
53 simple tabbed terminal. It is installed by default, so any of these should
54 give you tabs:
55
56    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -pe tabbed
57
58    URxvt.perl-ext-common: default,tabbed
59
60 It will also work fine with tabbing functionality of many window managers
61 or similar tabbing programs, and its embedding-features allow it to be
62 embedded into other programs, as witnessed by F<doc/rxvt-tabbed> or
63 the upcoming C<Gtk2::URxvt> perl module, which features a tabbed urxvt
64 (murxvt) terminal as an example embedding application.
65
66 =head3 How do I know which rxvt-unicode version I'm using?
67
68 The version number is displayed with the usage (-h). Also the escape
69 sequence C<ESC [ 8 n> sets the window title to the version number. When
70 using the @@URXVT_NAME@@c client, the version displayed is that of the
71 daemon.
72
73 =head3 Rxvt-unicode uses gobs of memory, how can I reduce that?
74
75 Rxvt-unicode tries to obey the rule of not charging you for something you
76 don't use. One thing you should try is to configure out all settings that
77 you don't need, for example, Xft support is a resource hog by design,
78 when used. Compiling it out ensures that no Xft font will be loaded
79 accidentally when rxvt-unicode tries to find a font for your characters.
80
81 Also, many people (me included) like large windows and even larger
82 scrollback buffers: Without C<--enable-unicode3>, rxvt-unicode will use
83 6 bytes per screen cell. For a 160x?? window this amounts to almost a
84 kilobyte per line. A scrollback buffer of 10000 lines will then (if full)
85 use 10 Megabytes of memory. With C<--enable-unicode3> it gets worse, as
86 rxvt-unicode then uses 8 bytes per screen cell.
87
88 =head3 How can I start @@URXVT_NAME@@d in a race-free way?
89
90 Try C<@@URXVT_NAME@@d -f -o>, which tells @@URXVT_NAME@@d to open the
91 display, create the listening socket and then fork.
92
93 =head3 How can I start @@URXVT_NAME@@d automatically when I run @@URXVT_NAME@@c?
94
95 If you want to start @@URXVT_NAME@@d automatically whenever you run
96 @@URXVT_NAME@@c and the daemon isn't running yet, use this script:
97
98    #!/bin/sh
99    @@URXVT_NAME@@c "$@"
100    if [ $? -eq 2 ]; then
101       @@URXVT_NAME@@d -q -o -f
102       @@URXVT_NAME@@c "$@"
103    fi
104
105 This tries to create a new terminal, and if fails with exit status 2,
106 meaning it couldn't connect to the daemon, it will start the daemon and
107 re-run the command. Subsequent invocations of the script will re-use the
108 existing daemon.
109
110 =head3 How do I distinguish whether I'm running rxvt-unicode or a regular xterm? I need this to decide about setting colors etc.
111
112 The original rxvt and rxvt-unicode always export the variable "COLORTERM",
113 so you can check and see if that is set. Note that several programs, JED,
114 slrn, Midnight Commander automatically check this variable to decide
115 whether or not to use color.
116
117 =head3 How do I set the correct, full IP address for the DISPLAY variable?
118
119 If you've compiled rxvt-unicode with DISPLAY_IS_IP and have enabled
120 insecure mode then it is possible to use the following shell script
121 snippets to correctly set the display. If your version of rxvt-unicode
122 wasn't also compiled with ESCZ_ANSWER (as assumed in these snippets) then
123 the COLORTERM variable can be used to distinguish rxvt-unicode from a
124 regular xterm.
125
126 Courtesy of Chuck Blake <cblake@BBN.COM> with the following shell script
127 snippets:
128
129    # Bourne/Korn/POSIX family of shells:
130    [ ${TERM:-foo} = foo ] && TERM=xterm # assume an xterm if we don't know
131    if [ ${TERM:-foo} = xterm ]; then
132       stty -icanon -echo min 0 time 15 # see if enhanced rxvt or not
133       echo -n '^[Z'
134       read term_id
135       stty icanon echo
136       if [ ""${term_id} = '^[[?1;2C' -a ${DISPLAY:-foo} = foo ]; then
137          echo -n '^[[7n'        # query the rxvt we are in for the DISPLAY string
138          read DISPLAY           # set it in our local shell
139       fi
140    fi
141
142 =head3 How do I compile the manual pages on my own?
143
144 You need to have a recent version of perl installed as F</usr/bin/perl>,
145 one that comes with F<pod2man>, F<pod2text> and F<pod2xhtml> (from
146 F<Pod::Xhtml>). Then go to the doc subdirectory and enter C<make alldoc>.
147
148 =head3 Isn't rxvt-unicode supposed to be small? Don't all those features bloat?
149
150 I often get asked about this, and I think, no, they didn't cause extra
151 bloat. If you compare a minimal rxvt and a minimal urxvt, you can see
152 that the urxvt binary is larger (due to some encoding tables always being
153 compiled in), but it actually uses less memory (RSS) after startup. Even
154 with C<--disable-everything>, this comparison is a bit unfair, as many
155 features unique to urxvt (locale, encoding conversion, iso14755 etc.) are
156 already in use in this mode.
157
158     text    data     bss     drs     rss filename
159    98398    1664      24   15695    1824 rxvt --disable-everything
160   188985    9048   66616   18222    1788 urxvt --disable-everything
161
162 When you C<--enable-everything> (which I<is> unfair, as this involves xft
163 and full locale/XIM support which are quite bloaty inside libX11 and my
164 libc), the two diverge, but not unreasonably so.
165
166     text    data     bss     drs     rss filename
167   163431    2152      24   20123    2060 rxvt --enable-everything
168  1035683   49680   66648   29096    3680 urxvt --enable-everything
169
170 The very large size of the text section is explained by the east-asian
171 encoding tables, which, if unused, take up disk space but nothing else
172 and can be compiled out unless you rely on X11 core fonts that use those
173 encodings. The BSS size comes from the 64k emergency buffer that my c++
174 compiler allocates (but of course doesn't use unless you are out of
175 memory). Also, using an xft font instead of a core font immediately adds a
176 few megabytes of RSS. Xft indeed is responsible for a lot of RSS even when
177 not used.
178
179 Of course, due to every character using two or four bytes instead of one,
180 a large scrollback buffer will ultimately make rxvt-unicode use more
181 memory.
182
183 Compared to e.g. Eterm (5112k), aterm (3132k) and xterm (4680k), this
184 still fares rather well. And compared to some monsters like gnome-terminal
185 (21152k + extra 4204k in separate processes) or konsole (22200k + extra
186 43180k in daemons that stay around after exit, plus half a minute of
187 startup time, including the hundreds of warnings it spits out), it fares
188 extremely well *g*.
189
190 =head3 Why C++, isn't that unportable/bloated/uncool?
191
192 Is this a question? :) It comes up very often. The simple answer is: I had
193 to write it, and C++ allowed me to write and maintain it in a fraction
194 of the time and effort (which is a scarce resource for me). Put even
195 shorter: It simply wouldn't exist without C++.
196
197 My personal stance on this is that C++ is less portable than C, but in
198 the case of rxvt-unicode this hardly matters, as its portability limits
199 are defined by things like X11, pseudo terminals, locale support and unix
200 domain sockets, which are all less portable than C++ itself.
201
202 Regarding the bloat, see the above question: It's easy to write programs
203 in C that use gobs of memory, an certainly possible to write programs in
204 C++ that don't. C++ also often comes with large libraries, but this is
205 not necessarily the case with GCC. Here is what rxvt links against on my
206 system with a minimal config:
207
208    libX11.so.6 => /usr/X11R6/lib/libX11.so.6 (0x00002aaaaabc3000)
209    libc.so.6 => /lib/libc.so.6 (0x00002aaaaadde000)
210    libdl.so.2 => /lib/libdl.so.2 (0x00002aaaab01d000)
211    /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00002aaaaaaab000)
212
213 And here is rxvt-unicode:
214
215    libX11.so.6 => /usr/X11R6/lib/libX11.so.6 (0x00002aaaaabc3000)
216    libgcc_s.so.1 => /lib/libgcc_s.so.1 (0x00002aaaaada2000)
217    libc.so.6 => /lib/libc.so.6 (0x00002aaaaaeb0000)
218    libdl.so.2 => /lib/libdl.so.2 (0x00002aaaab0ee000)
219    /lib64/ld-linux-x86-64.so.2 (0x00002aaaaaaab000)
220
221 No large bloated libraries (of course, none were linked in statically),
222 except maybe libX11 :)
223
224
225 =head2 Rendering, Font & Look and Feel Issues
226
227 =head3 I can't get transparency working, what am I doing wrong?
228
229 First of all, please address all transparency related issues to Sasha Vasko at
230 sasha@aftercode.net and do not bug the author about it. Also, if you can't
231 get it working consider it a rite of passage: ... and you failed.
232
233 Here are four ways to get transparency. B<Do> read the manpage and option
234 descriptions for the programs mentioned and rxvt-unicode. Really, do it!
235
236 1. Use transparent mode:
237
238    Esetroot wallpaper.jpg
239    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -tr -tint red -sh 40
240
241 That works. If you think it doesn't, you lack transparency and tinting
242 support, or you are unable to read.
243
244 2. Use a simple pixmap and emulate pseudo-transparency. This enables you
245 to use effects other than tinting and shading: Just shade/tint/whatever
246 your picture with gimp or any other tool:
247
248    convert wallpaper.jpg -blur 20x20 -modulate 30 background.jpg
249    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -pixmap "background.jpg;:root"
250
251 That works. If you think it doesn't, you lack AfterImage support, or you
252 are unable to read.
253
254 3. Use an ARGB visual:
255
256    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -depth 32 -fg grey90 -bg rgba:0000/0000/4444/cccc
257
258 This requires XFT support, and the support of your X-server. If that
259 doesn't work for you, blame Xorg and Keith Packard. ARGB visuals aren't
260 there yet, no matter what they claim. Rxvt-Unicode contains the necessary
261 bugfixes and workarounds for Xft and Xlib to make it work, but that
262 doesn't mean that your WM has the required kludges in place.
263
264 4. Use xcompmgr and let it do the job:
265
266   xprop -frame -f _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY 32c \
267         -set _NET_WM_WINDOW_OPACITY 0xc0000000
268
269 Then click on a window you want to make transparent. Replace C<0xc0000000>
270 by other values to change the degree of opacity. If it doesn't work and
271 your server crashes, you got to keep the pieces.
272
273 =head3 Why does rxvt-unicode sometimes leave pixel droppings?
274
275 Most fonts were not designed for terminal use, which means that character
276 size varies a lot. A font that is otherwise fine for terminal use might
277 contain some characters that are simply too wide. Rxvt-unicode will avoid
278 these characters. For characters that are just "a bit" too wide a special
279 "careful" rendering mode is used that redraws adjacent characters.
280
281 All of this requires that fonts do not lie about character sizes,
282 however: Xft fonts often draw glyphs larger than their acclaimed bounding
283 box, and rxvt-unicode has no way of detecting this (the correct way is to
284 ask for the character bounding box, which unfortunately is wrong in these
285 cases).
286
287 It's not clear (to me at least), whether this is a bug in Xft, freetype,
288 or the respective font. If you encounter this problem you might try using
289 the C<-lsp> option to give the font more height. If that doesn't work, you
290 might be forced to use a different font.
291
292 All of this is not a problem when using X11 core fonts, as their bounding
293 box data is correct.
294
295 =head3 How can I keep rxvt-unicode from using reverse video so much?
296
297 First of all, make sure you are running with the right terminal settings
298 (C<TERM=rxvt-unicode>), which will get rid of most of these effects. Then
299 make sure you have specified colours for italic and bold, as otherwise
300 rxvt-unicode might use reverse video to simulate the effect:
301
302    URxvt.colorBD:  white
303    URxvt.colorIT:  green
304
305 =head3 Some programs assume totally weird colours (red instead of blue), how can I fix that?
306
307 For some unexplainable reason, some rare programs assume a very weird
308 colour palette when confronted with a terminal with more than the standard
309 8 colours (rxvt-unicode supports 88). The right fix is, of course, to fix
310 these programs not to assume non-ISO colours without very good reasons.
311
312 In the meantime, you can either edit your C<rxvt-unicode> terminfo
313 definition to only claim 8 colour support or use C<TERM=rxvt>, which will
314 fix colours but keep you from using other rxvt-unicode features.
315
316 =head3 Can I switch the fonts at runtime?
317
318 Yes, using an escape sequence. Try something like this, which has the same
319 effect as using the C<-fn> switch, and takes effect immediately:
320
321    printf '\33]50;%s\007' "9x15bold,xft:Kochi Gothic"
322
323 This is useful if you e.g. work primarily with japanese (and prefer a
324 japanese font), but you have to switch to chinese temporarily, where
325 japanese fonts would only be in your way.
326
327 You can think of this as a kind of manual ISO-2022 switching.
328
329 =head3 Why do italic characters look as if clipped?
330
331 Many fonts have difficulties with italic characters and hinting. For
332 example, the otherwise very nicely hinted font C<xft:Bitstream Vera Sans
333 Mono> completely fails in its italic face. A workaround might be to
334 enable freetype autohinting, i.e. like this:
335
336    URxvt.italicFont:        xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:italic:autohint=true
337    URxvt.boldItalicFont:    xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:bold:italic:autohint=true
338
339 =head3 Can I speed up Xft rendering somehow?
340
341 Yes, the most obvious way to speed it up is to avoid Xft entirely, as
342 it is simply slow. If you still want Xft fonts you might try to disable
343 antialiasing (by appending C<:antialias=false>), which saves lots of
344 memory and also speeds up rendering considerably.
345
346 =head3 Rxvt-unicode doesn't seem to anti-alias its fonts, what is wrong?
347
348 Rxvt-unicode will use whatever you specify as a font. If it needs to
349 fall back to its default font search list it will prefer X11 core
350 fonts, because they are small and fast, and then use Xft fonts. It has
351 antialiasing disabled for most of them, because the author thinks they
352 look best that way.
353
354 If you want antialiasing, you have to specify the fonts manually.
355
356 =head3 What's with this bold/blink stuff?
357
358 If no bold colour is set via C<colorBD:>, bold will invert text using the
359 standard foreground colour.
360
361 For the standard background colour, blinking will actually make
362 the text blink when compiled with C<--enable-text-blink>. Without
363 C<--enable-text-blink>, the blink attribute will be ignored.
364
365 On ANSI colours, bold/blink attributes are used to set high-intensity
366 foreground/background colors.
367
368 color0-7 are the low-intensity colors.
369
370 color8-15 are the corresponding high-intensity colors.
371
372 =head3 I don't like the screen colors.  How do I change them?
373
374 You can change the screen colors at run-time using F<~/.Xdefaults>
375 resources (or as long-options).
376
377 Here are values that are supposed to resemble a VGA screen,
378 including the murky brown that passes for low-intensity yellow:
379
380    URxvt.color0:   #000000
381    URxvt.color1:   #A80000
382    URxvt.color2:   #00A800
383    URxvt.color3:   #A8A800
384    URxvt.color4:   #0000A8
385    URxvt.color5:   #A800A8
386    URxvt.color6:   #00A8A8
387    URxvt.color7:   #A8A8A8
388
389    URxvt.color8:   #000054
390    URxvt.color9:   #FF0054
391    URxvt.color10:  #00FF54
392    URxvt.color11:  #FFFF54
393    URxvt.color12:  #0000FF
394    URxvt.color13:  #FF00FF
395    URxvt.color14:  #00FFFF
396    URxvt.color15:  #FFFFFF
397
398 And here is a more complete set of non-standard colors.
399
400    URxvt.cursorColor:  #dc74d1
401    URxvt.pointerColor: #dc74d1
402    URxvt.background:   #0e0e0e
403    URxvt.foreground:   #4ad5e1
404    URxvt.color0:       #000000
405    URxvt.color8:       #8b8f93
406    URxvt.color1:       #dc74d1
407    URxvt.color9:       #dc74d1
408    URxvt.color2:       #0eb8c7
409    URxvt.color10:      #0eb8c7
410    URxvt.color3:       #dfe37e
411    URxvt.color11:      #dfe37e
412    URxvt.color5:       #9e88f0
413    URxvt.color13:      #9e88f0
414    URxvt.color6:       #73f7ff
415    URxvt.color14:      #73f7ff
416    URxvt.color7:       #e1dddd
417    URxvt.color15:      #e1dddd
418
419 They have been described (not by me) as "pretty girly".
420
421 =head3 Why do some characters look so much different than others?
422
423 See next entry.
424
425 =head3 How does rxvt-unicode choose fonts?
426
427 Most fonts do not contain the full range of Unicode, which is
428 fine. Chances are that the font you (or the admin/package maintainer of
429 your system/os) have specified does not cover all the characters you want
430 to display.
431
432 B<rxvt-unicode> makes a best-effort try at finding a replacement
433 font. Often the result is fine, but sometimes the chosen font looks
434 bad/ugly/wrong. Some fonts have totally strange characters that don't
435 resemble the correct glyph at all, and rxvt-unicode lacks the artificial
436 intelligence to detect that a specific glyph is wrong: it has to believe
437 the font that the characters it claims to contain indeed look correct.
438
439 In that case, select a font of your taste and add it to the font list,
440 e.g.:
441
442    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -fn basefont,font2,font3...
443
444 When rxvt-unicode sees a character, it will first look at the base
445 font. If the base font does not contain the character, it will go to the
446 next font, and so on. Specifying your own fonts will also speed up this
447 search and use less resources within rxvt-unicode and the X-server.
448
449 The only limitation is that none of the fonts may be larger than the base
450 font, as the base font defines the terminal character cell size, which
451 must be the same due to the way terminals work.
452
453 =head3 Why do some chinese characters look so different than others?
454
455 This is because there is a difference between script and language --
456 rxvt-unicode does not know which language the text that is output is,
457 as it only knows the unicode character codes. If rxvt-unicode first
458 sees a japanese/chinese character, it might choose a japanese font for
459 display. Subsequent japanese characters will use that font. Now, many
460 chinese characters aren't represented in japanese fonts, so when the first
461 non-japanese character comes up, rxvt-unicode will look for a chinese font
462 -- unfortunately at this point, it will still use the japanese font for
463 chinese characters that are also in the japanese font.
464
465 The workaround is easy: just tag a chinese font at the end of your font
466 list (see the previous question). The key is to view the font list as
467 a preference list: If you expect more japanese, list a japanese font
468 first. If you expect more chinese, put a chinese font first.
469
470 In the future it might be possible to switch language preferences at
471 runtime (the internal data structure has no problem with using different
472 fonts for the same character at the same time, but no interface for this
473 has been designed yet).
474
475 Until then, you might get away with switching fonts at runtime (see L<Can
476 I switch the fonts at runtime?> later in this document).
477
478 =head3 How can I make mplayer display video correctly?
479
480 We are working on it, in the meantime, as a workaround, use something like:
481
482    @@URXVT_NAME@@ -b 600 -geometry 20x1 -e sh -c 'mplayer -wid $WINDOWID file...'
483
484
485 =head2 Keyboard, Mouse & User Interaction
486
487 =head3 The new selection selects pieces that are too big, how can I select single words?
488
489 If you want to select e.g. alphanumeric words, you can use the following
490 setting:
491
492    URxvt.selection.pattern-0: ([[:word:]]+)
493
494 If you click more than twice, the selection will be extended
495 more and more.
496
497 To get a selection that is very similar to the old code, try this pattern:
498
499    URxvt.selection.pattern-0: ([^"&'()*,;<=>?@[\\\\]^`{|})]+)
500
501 Please also note that the I<LeftClick Shift-LeftClick> combination also
502 selects words like the old code.
503
504 =head3 I don't like the new selection/popups/hotkeys/perl, how do I change/disable it?
505
506 You can disable the perl extension completely by setting the
507 B<perl-ext-common> resource to the empty string, which also keeps
508 rxvt-unicode from initialising perl, saving memory.
509
510 If you only want to disable specific features, you first have to
511 identify which perl extension is responsible. For this, read the section
512 B<PREPACKAGED EXTENSIONS> in the @@URXVT_NAME@@perl(3) manpage. For
513 example, to disable the B<selection-popup> and B<option-popup>, specify
514 this B<perl-ext-common> resource:
515
516    URxvt.perl-ext-common: default,-selection-popup,-option-popup
517
518 This will keep the default extensions, but disable the two popup
519 extensions. Some extensions can also be configured, for example,
520 scrollback search mode is triggered by B<M-s>. You can move it to any
521 other combination either by setting the B<searchable-scrollback> resource:
522
523    URxvt.searchable-scrollback: CM-s
524
525 =head3 The cursor moves when selecting text in the current input line, how do I switch this off?
526
527 See next entry.
528
529 =head3 During rlogin/ssh/telnet/etc. sessions, clicking near the cursor outputs strange escape sequences, how do I fix this?
530
531 These are caused by the C<readline> perl extension. Under normal
532 circumstances, it will move your cursor around when you click into the
533 line that contains it. It tries hard not to do this at the wrong moment,
534 but when running a program that doesn't parse cursor movements or in some
535 cases during rlogin sessions, it fails to detect this properly.
536
537 You can permanently switch this feature off by disabling the C<readline>
538 extension:
539
540    URxvt.perl-ext-common: default,-readline
541
542 =head3 My numerical keypad acts weird and generates differing output?
543
544 Some Debian GNUL/Linux users seem to have this problem, although no
545 specific details were reported so far. It is possible that this is caused
546 by the wrong C<TERM> setting, although the details of whether and how
547 this can happen are unknown, as C<TERM=rxvt> should offer a compatible
548 keymap. See the answer to the previous question, and please report if that
549 helped.
550
551 =head3 My Compose (Multi_key) key is no longer working.
552
553 The most common causes for this are that either your locale is not set
554 correctly, or you specified a B<preeditStyle> that is not supported by
555 your input method. For example, if you specified B<OverTheSpot> and
556 your input method (e.g. the default input method handling Compose keys)
557 does not support this (for instance because it is not visual), then
558 rxvt-unicode will continue without an input method.
559
560 In this case either do not specify a B<preeditStyle> or specify more than
561 one pre-edit style, such as B<OverTheSpot,Root,None>.
562
563 If it still doesn't work, then maybe your input method doesn't support
564 compose sequences - to fall back to the built-in one, make sure you don't
565 specify an input method via C<-im> or C<XMODIFIERS>.
566
567 =head3 I cannot type C<Ctrl-Shift-2> to get an ASCII NUL character due to ISO 14755
568
569 Either try C<Ctrl-2> alone (it often is mapped to ASCII NUL even on
570 international keyboards) or simply use ISO 14755 support to your
571 advantage, typing <Ctrl-Shift-0> to get a ASCII NUL. This works for other
572 codes, too, such as C<Ctrl-Shift-1-d> to type the default telnet escape
573 character and so on.
574
575 =head3 Mouse cut/paste suddenly no longer works.
576
577 Make sure that mouse reporting is actually turned off since killing
578 some editors prematurely may leave the mouse in mouse report mode. I've
579 heard that tcsh may use mouse reporting unless it otherwise specified. A
580 quick check is to see if cut/paste works when the Alt or Shift keys are
581 depressed.
582
583 =head3 What's with the strange Backspace/Delete key behaviour?
584
585 Assuming that the physical Backspace key corresponds to the
586 Backspace keysym (not likely for Linux ... see the following
587 question) there are two standard values that can be used for
588 Backspace: C<^H> and C<^?>.
589
590 Historically, either value is correct, but rxvt-unicode adopts the debian
591 policy of using C<^?> when unsure, because it's the one and only correct
592 choice :).
593
594 Rxvt-unicode tries to inherit the current stty settings and uses the value
595 of `erase' to guess the value for backspace.  If rxvt-unicode wasn't
596 started from a terminal (say, from a menu or by remote shell), then the
597 system value of `erase', which corresponds to CERASE in <termios.h>, will
598 be used (which may not be the same as your stty setting).
599
600 For starting a new rxvt-unicode:
601
602    # use Backspace = ^H
603    $ stty erase ^H
604    $ @@URXVT_NAME@@
605
606    # use Backspace = ^?
607    $ stty erase ^?
608    $ @@URXVT_NAME@@
609
610 Toggle with C<ESC [ 36 h> / C<ESC [ 36 l>.
611
612 For an existing rxvt-unicode:
613
614    # use Backspace = ^H
615    $ stty erase ^H
616    $ echo -n "^[[36h"
617
618    # use Backspace = ^?
619    $ stty erase ^?
620    $ echo -n "^[[36l"
621
622 This helps satisfy some of the Backspace discrepancies that occur, but
623 if you use Backspace = C<^H>, make sure that the termcap/terminfo value
624 properly reflects that.
625
626 The Delete key is a another casualty of the ill-defined Backspace problem.
627 To avoid confusion between the Backspace and Delete keys, the Delete
628 key has been assigned an escape sequence to match the vt100 for Execute
629 (C<ESC [ 3 ~>) and is in the supplied termcap/terminfo.
630
631 Some other Backspace problems:
632
633 some editors use termcap/terminfo,
634 some editors (vim I'm told) expect Backspace = ^H,
635 GNU Emacs (and Emacs-like editors) use ^H for help.
636
637 Perhaps someday this will all be resolved in a consistent manner.
638
639 =head3 I don't like the key-bindings.  How do I change them?
640
641 There are some compile-time selections available via configure. Unless
642 you have run "configure" with the C<--disable-resources> option you can
643 use the `keysym' resource to alter the keystrings associated with keysyms.
644
645 Here's an example for a URxvt session started using C<@@URXVT_NAME@@ -name URxvt>
646
647    URxvt.keysym.Home:          \033[1~
648    URxvt.keysym.End:           \033[4~
649    URxvt.keysym.C-apostrophe:  \033<C-'>
650    URxvt.keysym.C-slash:       \033<C-/>
651    URxvt.keysym.C-semicolon:   \033<C-;>
652    URxvt.keysym.C-grave:       \033<C-`>
653    URxvt.keysym.C-comma:       \033<C-,>
654    URxvt.keysym.C-period:      \033<C-.>
655    URxvt.keysym.C-0x60:        \033<C-`>
656    URxvt.keysym.C-Tab:         \033<C-Tab>
657    URxvt.keysym.C-Return:      \033<C-Return>
658    URxvt.keysym.S-Return:      \033<S-Return>
659    URxvt.keysym.S-space:       \033<S-Space>
660    URxvt.keysym.M-Up:          \033<M-Up>
661    URxvt.keysym.M-Down:        \033<M-Down>
662    URxvt.keysym.M-Left:        \033<M-Left>
663    URxvt.keysym.M-Right:       \033<M-Right>
664    URxvt.keysym.M-C-0:         list \033<M-C- 0123456789 >
665    URxvt.keysym.M-C-a:         list \033<M-C- abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz >
666    URxvt.keysym.F12:           command:\033]701;zh_CN.GBK\007
667
668 See some more examples in the documentation for the B<keysym> resource.
669
670 =head3 I'm using keyboard model XXX that has extra Prior/Next/Insert keys. How do I make use of them? For example, the Sun Keyboard type 4 has the following map
671
672    KP_Insert == Insert
673    F22 == Print
674    F27 == Home
675    F29 == Prior
676    F33 == End
677    F35 == Next
678
679 Rather than have rxvt-unicode try to accommodate all the various possible
680 keyboard mappings, it is better to use `xmodmap' to remap the keys as
681 required for your particular machine.
682
683
684 =head2 Terminal Configuration
685
686 =head3 Can I see a typical configuration?
687
688 The default configuration tries to be xterm-like, which I don't like that
689 much, but it's least surprise to regular users.
690
691 As a rxvt or rxvt-unicode user, you are practically supposed to invest
692 time into customising your terminal. To get you started, here is the
693 author's .Xdefaults entries, with comments on what they do. It's certainly
694 not I<typical>, but what's typical...
695
696    URxvt.cutchars: "()*,<>[]{}|'
697    URxvt.print-pipe: cat >/tmp/xxx
698
699 These are just for testing stuff.
700
701    URxvt.imLocale: ja_JP.UTF-8
702    URxvt.preeditType: OnTheSpot,None
703
704 This tells rxvt-unicode to use a special locale when communicating with
705 the X Input Method, and also tells it to only use the OnTheSpot pre-edit
706 type, which requires the C<xim-onthespot> perl extension but rewards me
707 with correct-looking fonts.
708
709    URxvt.perl-lib: /root/lib/urxvt
710    URxvt.perl-ext-common: default,selection-autotransform,selection-pastebin,xim-onthespot,remote-clipboard
711    URxvt.selection.pattern-0: ( at .*? line \\d+)
712    URxvt.selection.pattern-1: ^(/[^:]+):\ 
713    URxvt.selection-autotransform.0: s/^([^:[:space:]]+):(\\d+):?$/:e \\Q$1\\E\\x0d:$2\\x0d/
714    URxvt.selection-autotransform.1: s/^ at (.*?) line (\\d+)$/:e \\Q$1\\E\\x0d:$2\\x0d/
715
716 This is my perl configuration. The first two set the perl library
717 directory and also tells urxvt to use a large number of extensions. I
718 develop for myself mostly, so I actually use most of the extensions I
719 write.
720
721 The selection stuff mainly makes the selection perl-error-message aware
722 and tells it to convert perl error messages into vi-commands to load the
723 relevant file and go to the error line number.
724
725    URxvt.scrollstyle:      plain
726    URxvt.secondaryScroll:  true
727
728 As the documentation says: plain is the preferred scrollbar for the
729 author. The C<secondaryScroll> configures urxvt to scroll in full-screen
730 apps, like screen, so lines scrolled out of screen end up in urxvt's
731 scrollback buffer.
732
733    URxvt.background:       #000000
734    URxvt.foreground:       gray90
735    URxvt.color7:           gray90
736    URxvt.colorBD:          #ffffff
737    URxvt.cursorColor:      #e0e080
738    URxvt.throughColor:     #8080f0
739    URxvt.highlightColor:   #f0f0f0
740
741 Some colours. Not sure which ones are being used or even non-defaults, but
742 these are in my .Xdefaults. Most notably, they set foreground/background
743 to light gray/black, and also make sure that the colour 7 matches the
744 default foreground colour.
745
746    URxvt.underlineColor:   yellow
747
748 Another colour, makes underline lines look different. Sometimes hurts, but
749 is mostly a nice effect.
750
751    URxvt.geometry:         154x36
752    URxvt.loginShell:       false
753    URxvt.meta:             ignore
754    URxvt.utmpInhibit:      true
755
756 Uh, well, should be mostly self-explanatory. By specifying some defaults
757 manually, I can quickly switch them for testing.
758
759    URxvt.saveLines:        8192
760
761 A large scrollback buffer is essential. Really.
762
763    URxvt.mapAlert:         true
764
765 The only case I use it is for my IRC window, which I like to keep
766 iconified till people msg me (which beeps).
767
768    URxvt.visualBell:       true
769
770 The audible bell is often annoying, especially when in a crowd.
771
772    URxvt.insecure:         true
773
774 Please don't hack my mutt! Ooops...
775
776    URxvt.pastableTabs:     false
777
778 I once thought this is a great idea.
779
780    urxvt.font:             9x15bold,\
781                            -misc-fixed-bold-r-normal--15-140-75-75-c-90-iso10646-1,\
782                            -misc-fixed-medium-r-normal--15-140-75-75-c-90-iso10646-1, \
783                            [codeset=JISX0208]xft:Kochi Gothic, \
784                            xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:autohint=true, \
785                            xft:Code2000:antialias=false
786    urxvt.boldFont:         -xos4-terminus-bold-r-normal--14-140-72-72-c-80-iso8859-15
787    urxvt.italicFont:       xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:italic:autohint=true
788    urxvt.boldItalicFont:   xft:Bitstream Vera Sans Mono:bold:italic:autohint=true
789
790 I wrote rxvt-unicode to be able to specify fonts exactly. So don't be
791 overwhelmed. A special note: the C<9x15bold> mentioned above is actually
792 the version from XFree-3.3, as XFree-4 replaced it by a totally different
793 font (different glyphs for C<;> and many other harmless characters),
794 while the second font is actually the C<9x15bold> from XFree4/XOrg. The
795 bold version has less chars than the medium version, so I use it for rare
796 characters, too. When editing sources with vim, I use italic for comments
797 and other stuff, which looks quite good with Bitstream Vera anti-aliased.
798
799 Terminus is a quite bad font (many very wrong glyphs), but for most of my
800 purposes, it works, and gives a different look, as my normal (Non-bold)
801 font is already bold, and I want to see a difference between bold and
802 normal fonts.
803
804 Please note that I used the C<urxvt> instance name and not the C<URxvt>
805 class name. That is because I use different configs for different purposes,
806 for example, my IRC window is started with C<-name IRC>, and uses these
807 defaults:
808
809    IRC*title:              IRC
810    IRC*geometry:           87x12+535+542
811    IRC*saveLines:          0
812    IRC*mapAlert:           true
813    IRC*font:               suxuseuro
814    IRC*boldFont:           suxuseuro
815    IRC*colorBD:            white
816    IRC*keysym.M-C-1:       command:\033]710;suxuseuro\007\033]711;suxuseuro\007
817    IRC*keysym.M-C-2:       command:\033]710;9x15bold\007\033]711;9x15bold\007
818
819 C<Alt-Ctrl-1> and C<Alt-Ctrl-2> switch between two different font
820 sizes. C<suxuseuro> allows me to keep an eye (and actually read)
821 stuff while keeping a very small window. If somebody pastes something
822 complicated (e.g. japanese), I temporarily switch to a larger font.
823
824 The above is all in my C<.Xdefaults> (I don't use C<.Xresources> nor
825 C<xrdb>). I also have some resources in a separate C<.Xdefaults-hostname>
826 file for different hosts, for example, on ym main desktop, I use:
827
828    URxvt.keysym.C-M-q: command:\033[3;5;5t
829    URxvt.keysym.C-M-y: command:\033[3;5;606t
830    URxvt.keysym.C-M-e: command:\033[3;1605;5t
831    URxvt.keysym.C-M-c: command:\033[3;1605;606t
832    URxvt.keysym.C-M-p: perl:test
833
834 The first for keysym definitions allow me to quickly bring some windows
835 in the layout I like most. Ion users might start laughing but will stop
836 immediately when I tell them that I use my own Fvwm2 module for much the
837 same effect as Ion provides, and I only very rarely use the above key
838 combinations :->
839
840 =head3 Why doesn't rxvt-unicode read my resources?
841
842 Well, why, indeed? It does, in a way very similar to other X
843 applications. Most importantly, this means that if you or your OS loads
844 resources into the X display (the right way to do it), rxvt-unicode will
845 ignore any resource files in your home directory. It will only read
846 F<$HOME/.Xdefaults> when no resources are attached to the display.
847
848 If you have or use an F<$HOME/.Xresources> file, chances are that
849 resources are loaded into your X-server. In this case, you have to
850 re-login after every change (or run F<xrdb -merge $HOME/.Xresources>).
851
852 Also consider the form resources have to use:
853
854   URxvt.resource: value
855
856 If you want to use another form (there are lots of different ways of
857 specifying resources), make sure you understand whether and why it
858 works. If unsure, use the form above.
859
860 =head3 When I log-in to another system it tells me about missing terminfo data?
861
862 The terminal description used by rxvt-unicode is not as widely available
863 as that for xterm, or even rxvt (for which the same problem often arises).
864
865 The correct solution for this problem is to install the terminfo, this can
866 be done by simply installing rxvt-unicode on the remote system as well
867 (in case you have a nice package manager ready), or you can install the
868 terminfo database manually like this (with ncurses infocmp. works as
869 user and root):
870
871    REMOTE=remotesystem.domain
872    infocmp rxvt-unicode | ssh $REMOTE "mkdir -p .terminfo && cat >/tmp/ti && tic /tmp/ti"
873
874 One some systems you might need to set C<$TERMINFO> to the full path of
875 F<$HOME/.terminfo> for this to work.
876
877 If you cannot or do not want to do this, then you can simply set
878 C<TERM=rxvt> or even C<TERM=xterm>, and live with the small number of
879 problems arising, which includes wrong keymapping, less and different
880 colours and some refresh errors in fullscreen applications. It's a nice
881 quick-and-dirty workaround for rare cases, though.
882
883 If you always want to do this (and are fine with the consequences) you
884 can either recompile rxvt-unicode with the desired TERM value or use a
885 resource to set it:
886
887    URxvt.termName: rxvt
888
889 If you don't plan to use B<rxvt> (quite common...) you could also replace
890 the rxvt terminfo file with the rxvt-unicode one and use C<TERM=rxvt>.
891
892 =head3 nano fails with "Error opening terminal: rxvt-unicode"
893
894 This exceptionally confusing and useless error message is printed by nano
895 when it can't find the terminfo database. Nothing is wrong with your
896 terminal, read the previous answer for a solution.
897
898 =head3 C<tic> outputs some error when compiling the terminfo entry.
899
900 Most likely it's the empty definition for C<enacs=>. Just replace it by
901 C<enacs=\E[0@> and try again.
902
903 =head3 C<bash>'s readline does not work correctly under @@URXVT_NAME@@.
904
905 See next entry.
906
907 =head3 I need a termcap file entry.
908
909 One reason you might want this is that some distributions or operating
910 systems still compile some programs using the long-obsoleted termcap
911 library (Fedora Core's bash is one example) and rely on a termcap entry
912 for C<rxvt-unicode>.
913
914 You could use rxvt's termcap entry with reasonable results in many cases.
915 You can also create a termcap entry by using terminfo's infocmp program
916 like this:
917
918    infocmp -C rxvt-unicode
919
920 Or you could use the termcap entry in doc/etc/rxvt-unicode.termcap,
921 generated by the command above.
922
923 =head3 Why does C<ls> no longer have coloured output?
924
925 The C<ls> in the GNU coreutils unfortunately doesn't use terminfo to
926 decide whether a terminal has colour, but uses its own configuration
927 file. Needless to say, C<rxvt-unicode> is not in its default file (among
928 with most other terminals supporting colour). Either add:
929
930    TERM rxvt-unicode
931
932 to C</etc/DIR_COLORS> or simply add:
933
934    alias ls='ls --color=auto'
935
936 to your C<.profile> or C<.bashrc>.
937
938 =head3 Why doesn't vim/emacs etc. use the 88 colour mode?
939
940 See next entry.
941
942 =head3 Why doesn't vim/emacs etc. make use of italic?
943
944 See next entry.
945
946 =head3 Why are the secondary screen-related options not working properly?
947
948 Make sure you are using C<TERM=rxvt-unicode>. Some pre-packaged
949 distributions (most notably Debian GNU/Linux) break rxvt-unicode
950 by setting C<TERM> to C<rxvt>, which doesn't have these extra
951 features. Unfortunately, some of these (most notably, again, Debian
952 GNU/Linux) furthermore fail to even install the C<rxvt-unicode> terminfo
953 file, so you will need to install it on your own (See the question B<When
954 I log-in to another system it tells me about missing terminfo data?> on
955 how to do this).
956
957
958 =head2 Encoding / Locale / Input Method Issues
959
960 =head3 Rxvt-unicode does not seem to understand the selected encoding?
961
962 See next entry.
963
964 =head3 Unicode does not seem to work?
965
966 If you encounter strange problems like typing an accented character but
967 getting two unrelated other characters or similar, or if program output is
968 subtly garbled, then you should check your locale settings.
969
970 Rxvt-unicode must be started with the same C<LC_CTYPE> setting as the
971 programs running in it. Often rxvt-unicode is started in the C<C> locale,
972 while the login script running within the rxvt-unicode window changes the
973 locale to something else, e.g. C<en_GB.UTF-8>. Needless to say, this is
974 not going to work, and is the most common cause for problems.
975
976 The best thing is to fix your startup environment, as you will likely run
977 into other problems. If nothing works you can try this in your .profile.
978
979   printf '\33]701;%s\007' "$LC_CTYPE"   # $LANG or $LC_ALL are worth a try, too
980
981 If this doesn't work, then maybe you use a C<LC_CTYPE> specification not
982 supported on your systems. Some systems have a C<locale> command which
983 displays this (also, C<perl -e0> can be used to check locale settings, as
984 it will complain loudly if it cannot set the locale). If it displays something
985 like:
986
987   locale: Cannot set LC_CTYPE to default locale: ...
988
989 Then the locale you specified is not supported on your system.
990
991 If nothing works and you are sure that everything is set correctly then
992 you will need to remember a little known fact: Some programs just don't
993 support locales :(
994
995 =head3 How does rxvt-unicode determine the encoding to use?
996
997 See next entry.
998
999 =head3 Is there an option to switch encodings?
1000
1001 Unlike some other terminals, rxvt-unicode has no encoding switch, and no
1002 specific "utf-8" mode, such as xterm. In fact, it doesn't even know about
1003 UTF-8 or any other encodings with respect to terminal I/O.
1004
1005 The reasons is that there exists a perfectly fine mechanism for selecting
1006 the encoding, doing I/O and (most important) communicating this to all
1007 applications so everybody agrees on character properties such as width
1008 and code number. This mechanism is the I<locale>. Applications not using
1009 that info will have problems (for example, C<xterm> gets the width of
1010 characters wrong as it uses its own, locale-independent table under all
1011 locales).
1012
1013 Rxvt-unicode uses the C<LC_CTYPE> locale category to select encoding. All
1014 programs doing the same (that is, most) will automatically agree in the
1015 interpretation of characters.
1016
1017 Unfortunately, there is no system-independent way to select locales, nor
1018 is there a standard on how locale specifiers will look like.
1019
1020 On most systems, the content of the C<LC_CTYPE> environment variable
1021 contains an arbitrary string which corresponds to an already-installed
1022 locale. Common names for locales are C<en_US.UTF-8>, C<de_DE.ISO-8859-15>,
1023 C<ja_JP.EUC-JP>, i.e. C<language_country.encoding>, but other forms
1024 (i.e. C<de> or C<german>) are also common.
1025
1026 Rxvt-unicode ignores all other locale categories, and except for
1027 the encoding, ignores country or language-specific settings,
1028 i.e. C<de_DE.UTF-8> and C<ja_JP.UTF-8> are the normally same to
1029 rxvt-unicode.
1030
1031 If you want to use a specific encoding you have to make sure you start
1032 rxvt-unicode with the correct C<LC_CTYPE> category.
1033
1034 =head3 Can I switch locales at runtime?
1035
1036 Yes, using an escape sequence. Try something like this, which sets
1037 rxvt-unicode's idea of C<LC_CTYPE>.
1038
1039   printf '\33]701;%s\007' ja_JP.SJIS
1040
1041 See also the previous answer.
1042
1043 Sometimes this capability is rather handy when you want to work in
1044 one locale (e.g. C<de_DE.UTF-8>) but some programs don't support it
1045 (e.g. UTF-8). For example, I use this script to start C<xjdic>, which
1046 first switches to a locale supported by xjdic and back later:
1047
1048    printf '\33]701;%s\007' ja_JP.SJIS
1049    xjdic -js
1050    printf '\33]701;%s\007' de_DE.UTF-8
1051
1052 You can also use xterm's C<luit> program, which usually works fine, except
1053 for some locales where character width differs between program- and
1054 rxvt-unicode-locales.
1055
1056 =head3 I have problems getting my input method working.
1057
1058 Try a search engine, as this is slightly different for every input method server.
1059
1060 Here is a checklist:
1061
1062 =over 4
1063
1064 =item - Make sure your locale I<and> the imLocale are supported on your OS.
1065
1066 Try C<locale -a> or check the documentation for your OS.
1067
1068 =item - Make sure your locale or imLocale matches a locale supported by your XIM.
1069
1070 For example, B<kinput2> does not support UTF-8 locales, you should use
1071 C<ja_JP.EUC-JP> or equivalent.
1072
1073 =item - Make sure your XIM server is actually running.
1074
1075 =item - Make sure the C<XMODIFIERS> environment variable is set correctly when I<starting> rxvt-unicode.
1076
1077 When you want to use e.g. B<kinput2>, it must be set to
1078 C<@im=kinput2>. For B<scim>, use C<@im=SCIM>. You can see what input
1079 method servers are running with this command:
1080
1081    xprop -root XIM_SERVERS
1082
1083 =item
1084
1085 =back
1086
1087 =head3 My input method wants <some encoding> but I want UTF-8, what can I do?
1088
1089 You can specify separate locales for the input method and the rest of the
1090 terminal, using the resource C<imlocale>:
1091
1092    URxvt.imlocale: ja_JP.EUC-JP
1093
1094 Now you can start your terminal with C<LC_CTYPE=ja_JP.UTF-8> and still
1095 use your input method. Please note, however, that, depending on your Xlib
1096 version, you may not be able to input characters outside C<EUC-JP> in a
1097 normal way then, as your input method limits you.
1098
1099 =head3 Rxvt-unicode crashes when the X Input Method changes or exits.
1100
1101 Unfortunately, this is unavoidable, as the XIM protocol is racy by
1102 design. Applications can avoid some crashes at the expense of memory
1103 leaks, and Input Methods can avoid some crashes by careful ordering at
1104 exit time. B<kinput2> (and derived input methods) generally succeeds,
1105 while B<SCIM> (or similar input methods) fails. In the end, however,
1106 crashes cannot be completely avoided even if both sides cooperate.
1107
1108 So the only workaround is not to kill your Input Method Servers.
1109
1110
1111 =head2 Operating Systems / Package Maintaining
1112
1113 =head3 I am using Debian GNU/Linux and have a problem...
1114
1115 The Debian GNU/Linux package of rxvt-unicode in sarge contains large
1116 patches that considerably change the behaviour of rxvt-unicode (but
1117 unfortunately this notice has been removed). Before reporting a bug to
1118 the original rxvt-unicode author please download and install the genuine
1119 version (L<http://software.schmorp.de#rxvt-unicode>) and try to reproduce
1120 the problem. If you cannot, chances are that the problems are specific to
1121 Debian GNU/Linux, in which case it should be reported via the Debian Bug
1122 Tracking System (use C<reportbug> to report the bug).
1123
1124 For other problems that also affect the Debian package, you can and
1125 probably should use the Debian BTS, too, because, after all, it's also a
1126 bug in the Debian version and it serves as a reminder for other users that
1127 might encounter the same issue.
1128
1129 =head3 I am maintaining rxvt-unicode for distribution/OS XXX, any recommendation?
1130
1131 You should build one binary with the default options. F<configure>
1132 now enables most useful options, and the trend goes to making them
1133 runtime-switchable, too, so there is usually no drawback to enabling them,
1134 except higher disk and possibly memory usage. The perl interpreter should
1135 be enabled, as important functionality (menus, selection, likely more in
1136 the future) depends on it.
1137
1138 You should not overwrite the C<perl-ext-common> and C<perl-ext> resources
1139 system-wide (except maybe with C<defaults>). This will result in useful
1140 behaviour. If your distribution aims at low memory, add an empty
1141 C<perl-ext-common> resource to the app-defaults file. This will keep the
1142 perl interpreter disabled until the user enables it.
1143
1144 If you can/want build more binaries, I recommend building a minimal
1145 one with C<--disable-everything> (very useful) and a maximal one with
1146 C<--enable-everything> (less useful, it will be very big due to a lot of
1147 encodings built-in that increase download times and are rarely used).
1148
1149 =head3 I need to make it setuid/setgid to support utmp/ptys on my OS, is this safe?
1150
1151 It should be, starting with release 7.1. You are encouraged to properly
1152 install urxvt with privileges necessary for your OS now.
1153
1154 When rxvt-unicode detects that it runs setuid or setgid, it will fork
1155 into a helper process for privileged operations (pty handling on some
1156 systems, utmp/wtmp/lastlog handling on others) and drop privileges
1157 immediately. This is much safer than most other terminals that keep
1158 privileges while running (but is more relevant to urxvt, as it contains
1159 things as perl interpreters, which might be "helpful" to attackers).
1160
1161 This forking is done as the very first within main(), which is very early
1162 and reduces possible bugs to initialisation code run before main(), or
1163 things like the dynamic loader of your system, which should result in very
1164 little risk.
1165
1166 =head3 I am on FreeBSD and rxvt-unicode does not seem to work at all.
1167
1168 Rxvt-unicode requires the symbol C<__STDC_ISO_10646__> to be defined
1169 in your compile environment, or an implementation that implements it,
1170 whether it defines the symbol or not. C<__STDC_ISO_10646__> requires that
1171 B<wchar_t> is represented as unicode.
1172
1173 As you might have guessed, FreeBSD does neither define this symbol nor
1174 does it support it. Instead, it uses its own internal representation of
1175 B<wchar_t>. This is, of course, completely fine with respect to standards.
1176
1177 However, that means rxvt-unicode only works in C<POSIX>, C<ISO-8859-1> and
1178 C<UTF-8> locales under FreeBSD (which all use Unicode as B<wchar_t>).
1179
1180 C<__STDC_ISO_10646__> is the only sane way to support multi-language
1181 apps in an OS, as using a locale-dependent (and non-standardized)
1182 representation of B<wchar_t> makes it impossible to convert between
1183 B<wchar_t> (as used by X11 and your applications) and any other encoding
1184 without implementing OS-specific-wrappers for each and every locale. There
1185 simply are no APIs to convert B<wchar_t> into anything except the current
1186 locale encoding.
1187
1188 Some applications (such as the formidable B<mlterm>) work around this
1189 by carrying their own replacement functions for character set handling
1190 with them, and either implementing OS-dependent hacks or doing multiple
1191 conversions (which is slow and unreliable in case the OS implements
1192 encodings slightly different than the terminal emulator).
1193
1194 The rxvt-unicode author insists that the right way to fix this is in the
1195 system libraries once and for all, instead of forcing every app to carry
1196 complete replacements for them :)
1197
1198 =head3 How can I use rxvt-unicode under cygwin?
1199
1200 rxvt-unicode should compile and run out of the box on cygwin, using
1201 the X11 libraries that come with cygwin. libW11 emulation is no
1202 longer supported (and makes no sense, either, as it only supported a
1203 single font). I recommend starting the X-server in C<-multiwindow> or
1204 C<-rootless> mode instead, which will result in similar look&feel as the
1205 old libW11 emulation.
1206
1207 At the time of this writing, cygwin didn't seem to support any multi-byte
1208 encodings (you might try C<LC_CTYPE=C-UTF-8>), so you are likely limited
1209 to 8-bit encodings.
1210
1211 =head3 Character widths are not correct.
1212
1213 urxvt uses the system wcwidth function to know the information about
1214 the width of characters, so on systems with incorrect locale data you
1215 will likely get bad results. Two notorious examples are Solaris 9,
1216 where single-width characters like U+2514 are reported as double-width,
1217 and Darwin 8, where combining chars are reported having width 1.
1218
1219 The solution is to upgrade your system or switch to a better one. A
1220 possibly working workaround is to use a wcwidth implementation like
1221
1222 http://www.cl.cam.ac.uk/~mgk25/ucs/wcwidth.c
1223
1224 =head1 RXVT-UNICODE TECHNICAL REFERENCE
1225
1226 The rest of this document describes various technical aspects of
1227 B<rxvt-unicode>. First the description of supported command sequences,
1228 followed by pixmap support and last by a description of all features
1229 selectable at C<configure> time.
1230
1231 =head2 Definitions
1232
1233 =over 4
1234
1235 =item B<< C<c> >>
1236
1237 The literal character c.
1238
1239 =item B<< C<C> >>
1240
1241 A single (required) character.
1242
1243 =item B<< C<Ps> >>
1244
1245 A single (usually optional) numeric parameter, composed of one or more
1246 digits.
1247
1248 =item B<< C<Pm> >>
1249
1250 A multiple numeric parameter composed of any number of single numeric
1251 parameters, separated by C<;> character(s).
1252
1253 =item B<< C<Pt> >>
1254
1255 A text parameter composed of printable characters.
1256
1257 =back
1258
1259 =head2 Values
1260
1261 =over 4
1262
1263 =item B<< C<ENQ> >>
1264
1265 Enquiry (Ctrl-E) = Send Device Attributes (DA)
1266 request attributes from terminal. See B<< C<ESC [ Ps c> >>.
1267
1268 =item B<< C<BEL> >>
1269
1270 Bell (Ctrl-G)
1271
1272 =item B<< C<BS> >>
1273
1274 Backspace (Ctrl-H)
1275
1276 =item B<< C<TAB> >>
1277
1278 Horizontal Tab (HT) (Ctrl-I)
1279
1280 =item B<< C<LF> >>
1281
1282 Line Feed or New Line (NL) (Ctrl-J)
1283
1284 =item B<< C<VT> >>
1285
1286 Vertical Tab (Ctrl-K) same as B<< C<LF> >>
1287
1288 =item B<< C<FF> >>
1289
1290 Form Feed or New Page (NP) (Ctrl-L) same as B<< C<LF> >>
1291
1292 =item B<< C<CR> >>
1293
1294 Carriage Return (Ctrl-M)
1295
1296 =item B<< C<SO> >>
1297
1298 Shift Out (Ctrl-N), invokes the G1 character set.
1299 Switch to Alternate Character Set
1300
1301 =item B<< C<SI> >>
1302
1303 Shift In (Ctrl-O), invokes the G0 character set (the default).
1304 Switch to Standard Character Set
1305
1306 =item B<< C<SPC> >>
1307
1308 Space Character
1309
1310 =back
1311
1312 =head2 Escape Sequences
1313
1314 =over 4
1315
1316 =item B<< C<ESC # 8> >>
1317
1318 DEC Screen Alignment Test (DECALN)
1319
1320 =item B<< C<ESC 7> >>
1321
1322 Save Cursor (SC)
1323
1324 =item B<< C<ESC 8> >>
1325
1326 Restore Cursor
1327
1328 =item B<< C<ESC => >>
1329
1330 Application Keypad (SMKX). See also next sequence.
1331
1332 =item B<<< C<< ESC > >> >>>
1333
1334 Normal Keypad (RMKX)
1335
1336 B<Note:> If the numeric keypad is activated, eg, B<Num_Lock> has been
1337 pressed, numbers or control functions are generated by the numeric keypad
1338 (see Key Codes).
1339
1340 =item B<< C<ESC D> >>
1341
1342 Index (IND)
1343
1344 =item B<< C<ESC E> >>
1345
1346 Next Line (NEL)
1347
1348 =item B<< C<ESC H> >>
1349
1350 Tab Set (HTS)
1351
1352 =item B<< C<ESC M> >>
1353
1354 Reverse Index (RI)
1355
1356 =item B<< C<ESC N> >>
1357
1358 Single Shift Select of G2 Character Set (SS2): affects next character
1359 only I<unimplemented>
1360
1361 =item B<< C<ESC O> >>
1362
1363 Single Shift Select of G3 Character Set (SS3): affects next character
1364 only I<unimplemented>
1365
1366 =item B<< C<ESC Z> >>
1367
1368 Obsolete form of returns: B<< C<ESC [ ? 1 ; 2 C> >> I<rxvt-unicode compile-time option>
1369
1370 =item B<< C<ESC c> >>
1371
1372 Full reset (RIS)
1373
1374 =item B<< C<ESC n> >>
1375
1376 Invoke the G2 Character Set (LS2)
1377
1378 =item B<< C<ESC o> >>
1379
1380 Invoke the G3 Character Set (LS3)
1381
1382 =item B<< C<ESC ( C> >>
1383
1384 Designate G0 Character Set (ISO 2022), see below for values of C<C>.
1385
1386 =item B<< C<ESC ) C> >>
1387
1388 Designate G1 Character Set (ISO 2022), see below for values of C<C>.
1389
1390 =item B<< C<ESC * C> >>
1391
1392 Designate G2 Character Set (ISO 2022), see below for values of C<C>.
1393
1394 =item B<< C<ESC + C> >>
1395
1396 Designate G3 Character Set (ISO 2022), see below for values of C<C>.
1397
1398 =item B<< C<ESC $ C> >>
1399
1400 Designate Kanji Character Set
1401
1402 Where B<< C<C> >> is one of:
1403
1404 =begin table
1405
1406         C = C<0>        DEC Special Character and Line Drawing Set
1407         C = C<A>        United Kingdom (UK)
1408         C = C<B>        United States (USASCII)
1409         C = C<< < >>    Multinational character set I<unimplemented>
1410         C = C<5>        Finnish character set I<unimplemented>
1411         C = C<C>        Finnish character set I<unimplemented>
1412         C = C<K>        German character set I<unimplemented>
1413
1414 =end table
1415
1416 =back
1417
1418 X<CSI>
1419
1420 =head2 CSI (Command Sequence Introducer) Sequences
1421
1422 =over 4
1423
1424 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps @> >>
1425
1426 Insert B<< C<Ps> >> (Blank) Character(s) [default: 1] (ICH)X<ESCOBPsA>
1427
1428 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps A> >>
1429
1430 Cursor Up B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] (CUU)
1431
1432 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps B> >>
1433
1434 Cursor Down B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] (CUD)X<ESCOBPsC>
1435
1436 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps C> >>
1437
1438 Cursor Forward B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] (CUF)
1439
1440 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps D> >>
1441
1442 Cursor Backward B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] (CUB)
1443
1444 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps E> >>
1445
1446 Cursor Down B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] and to first column
1447
1448 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps F> >>
1449
1450 Cursor Up B<< C<Ps> >> Times [default: 1] and to first columnX<ESCOBPsG>
1451
1452 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps G> >>
1453
1454 Cursor to Column B<< C<Ps> >> (HPA)
1455
1456 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps;Ps H> >>
1457
1458 Cursor Position [row;column] [default: 1;1] (CUP)
1459
1460 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps I> >>
1461
1462 Move forward B<< C<Ps> >> tab stops [default: 1]
1463
1464 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps J> >>
1465
1466 Erase in Display (ED)
1467
1468 =begin table
1469
1470         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Clear Below (default)
1471         B<< C<Ps = 1> >>        Clear Above
1472         B<< C<Ps = 2> >>        Clear All
1473
1474 =end table
1475
1476 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps K> >>
1477
1478 Erase in Line (EL)
1479
1480 =begin table
1481
1482         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Clear to Right (default)
1483         B<< C<Ps = 1> >>        Clear to Left
1484         B<< C<Ps = 2> >>        Clear All
1485         B<< C<Ps = 3> >>        Like Ps = 0, but is ignored when wrapped
1486                                 (@@RXVT_NAME@@ extension)
1487
1488 =end table
1489
1490 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps L> >>
1491
1492 Insert B<< C<Ps> >> Line(s) [default: 1] (IL)
1493
1494 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps M> >>
1495
1496 Delete B<< C<Ps> >> Line(s) [default: 1] (DL)
1497
1498 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps P> >>
1499
1500 Delete B<< C<Ps> >> Character(s) [default: 1] (DCH)
1501
1502 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps;Ps;Ps;Ps;Ps T> >>
1503
1504 Initiate . I<unimplemented> Parameters are
1505 [func;startx;starty;firstrow;lastrow].
1506
1507 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps W> >>
1508
1509 Tabulator functions
1510
1511 =begin table
1512
1513         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Tab Set (HTS)
1514         B<< C<Ps = 2> >>        Tab Clear (TBC), Clear Current Column (default)
1515         B<< C<Ps = 5> >>        Tab Clear (TBC), Clear All
1516
1517 =end table
1518
1519 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps X> >>
1520
1521 Erase B<< C<Ps> >> Character(s) [default: 1] (ECH)
1522
1523 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps Z> >>
1524
1525 Move backward B<< C<Ps> >> [default: 1] tab stops
1526
1527 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps '> >>
1528
1529 See B<< C<ESC [ Ps G> >>
1530
1531 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps a> >>
1532
1533 See B<< C<ESC [ Ps C> >>
1534
1535 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps c> >>
1536
1537 Send Device Attributes (DA)
1538 B<< C<Ps = 0> >> (or omitted): request attributes from terminal
1539 returns: B<< C<ESC [ ? 1 ; 2 c> >> (``I am a VT100 with Advanced Video
1540 Option'')
1541
1542 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps d> >>
1543
1544 Cursor to Line B<< C<Ps> >> (VPA)
1545
1546 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps e> >>
1547
1548 See B<< C<ESC [ Ps A> >>
1549
1550 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps;Ps f> >>
1551
1552 Horizontal and Vertical Position [row;column] (HVP) [default: 1;1]
1553
1554 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps g> >>
1555
1556 Tab Clear (TBC)
1557
1558 =begin table
1559
1560         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Clear Current Column (default)
1561         B<< C<Ps = 3> >>        Clear All (TBC)
1562
1563 =end table
1564
1565 =item B<< C<ESC [ Pm h> >>
1566
1567 Set Mode (SM). See B<< C<ESC [ Pm l> >> sequence for description of C<Pm>.
1568
1569 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps i> >>
1570
1571 Printing. See also the C<print-pipe> resource.
1572
1573 =begin table
1574
1575         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        print screen (MC0)
1576         B<< C<Ps = 4> >>        disable transparent print mode (MC4)
1577         B<< C<Ps = 5> >>        enable transparent print mode (MC5)
1578
1579 =end table
1580
1581 =item B<< C<ESC [ Pm l> >>
1582
1583 Reset Mode (RM)
1584
1585 =over 4
1586
1587 =item B<< C<Ps = 4> >>
1588
1589 =begin table
1590
1591         B<< C<h> >>     Insert Mode (SMIR)
1592         B<< C<l> >>     Replace Mode (RMIR)
1593
1594 =end table
1595
1596 =item B<< C<Ps = 20> >> (partially implemented)
1597
1598 =begin table
1599
1600         B<< C<h> >>     Automatic Newline (LNM)
1601         B<< C<l> >>     Normal Linefeed (LNM)
1602
1603 =end table
1604
1605 =back
1606
1607 =item B<< C<ESC [ Pm m> >>
1608
1609 Character Attributes (SGR)
1610
1611 =begin table
1612
1613         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Normal (default)
1614         B<< C<Ps = 1 / 21> >>   On / Off Bold (bright fg)
1615         B<< C<Ps = 3 / 23> >>   On / Off Italic
1616         B<< C<Ps = 4 / 24> >>   On / Off Underline
1617         B<< C<Ps = 5 / 25> >>   On / Off Slow Blink (bright bg)
1618         B<< C<Ps = 6 / 26> >>   On / Off Rapid Blink (bright bg)
1619         B<< C<Ps = 7 / 27> >>   On / Off Inverse
1620         B<< C<Ps = 8 / 27> >>   On / Off Invisible (NYI)
1621         B<< C<Ps = 30 / 40> >>  fg/bg Black
1622         B<< C<Ps = 31 / 41> >>  fg/bg Red
1623         B<< C<Ps = 32 / 42> >>  fg/bg Green
1624         B<< C<Ps = 33 / 43> >>  fg/bg Yellow
1625         B<< C<Ps = 34 / 44> >>  fg/bg Blue
1626         B<< C<Ps = 35 / 45> >>  fg/bg Magenta
1627         B<< C<Ps = 36 / 46> >>  fg/bg Cyan
1628         B<< C<Ps = 38;5 / 48;5> >>      set fg/bg to color #m (ISO 8613-6)
1629         B<< C<Ps = 37 / 47> >>  fg/bg White
1630         B<< C<Ps = 39 / 49> >>  fg/bg Default
1631         B<< C<Ps = 90 / 100> >> fg/bg Bright Black
1632         B<< C<Ps = 91 / 101> >> fg/bg Bright Red
1633         B<< C<Ps = 92 / 102> >> fg/bg Bright Green
1634         B<< C<Ps = 93 / 103> >> fg/bg Bright Yellow
1635         B<< C<Ps = 94 / 104> >> fg/bg Bright Blue
1636         B<< C<Ps = 95 / 105> >> fg/bg Bright Magenta
1637         B<< C<Ps = 96 / 106> >> fg/bg Bright Cyan
1638         B<< C<Ps = 97 / 107> >> fg/bg Bright White
1639         B<< C<Ps = 99 / 109> >> fg/bg Bright Default
1640
1641 =end table
1642
1643 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps n> >>
1644
1645 Device Status Report (DSR)
1646
1647 =begin table
1648
1649         B<< C<Ps = 5> >>        Status Report B<< C<ESC [ 0 n> >> (``OK'')
1650         B<< C<Ps = 6> >>        Report Cursor Position (CPR) [row;column] as B<< C<ESC [ r ; c R> >>
1651         B<< C<Ps = 7> >>        Request Display Name
1652         B<< C<Ps = 8> >>        Request Version Number (place in window title)
1653
1654 =end table
1655
1656 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps;Ps r> >>
1657
1658 Set Scrolling Region [top;bottom]
1659 [default: full size of window] (CSR)
1660
1661 =item B<< C<ESC [ s> >>
1662
1663 Save Cursor (SC)
1664
1665 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps;Pt t> >>
1666
1667 Window Operations
1668
1669 =begin table
1670
1671         B<< C<Ps = 1> >>        Deiconify (map) window
1672         B<< C<Ps = 2> >>        Iconify window
1673         B<< C<Ps = 3> >>        B<< C<ESC [ 3 ; X ; Y t> >> Move window to (X|Y)
1674         B<< C<Ps = 4> >>        B<< C<ESC [ 4 ; H ; W t> >> Resize to WxH pixels
1675         B<< C<Ps = 5> >>        Raise window
1676         B<< C<Ps = 6> >>        Lower window
1677         B<< C<Ps = 7> >>        Refresh screen once
1678         B<< C<Ps = 8> >>        B<< C<ESC [ 8 ; R ; C t> >> Resize to R rows and C columns
1679         B<< C<Ps = 11> >>       Report window state (responds with C<Ps = 1> or C<Ps = 2>)
1680         B<< C<Ps = 13> >>       Report window position (responds with C<Ps = 3>)
1681         B<< C<Ps = 14> >>       Report window pixel size (responds with C<Ps = 4>)
1682         B<< C<Ps = 18> >>       Report window text size (responds with C<Ps = 7>)
1683         B<< C<Ps = 19> >>       Currently the same as C<Ps = 18>, but responds with C<Ps = 9>
1684         B<< C<Ps = 20> >>       Reports icon label (B<< C<ESC ] L NAME \234> >>)
1685         B<< C<Ps = 21> >>       Reports window title (B<< C<ESC ] l NAME \234> >>)
1686         B<< C<Ps = 24..> >>     Set window height to C<Ps> rows
1687
1688 =end table
1689
1690 =item B<< C<ESC [ u> >>
1691
1692 Restore Cursor
1693
1694 =item B<< C<ESC [ Ps x> >>
1695
1696 Request Terminal Parameters (DECREQTPARM)
1697
1698 =back
1699
1700 X<PrivateModes>
1701
1702 =head2 DEC Private Modes
1703
1704 =over 4
1705
1706 =item B<< C<ESC [ ? Pm h> >>
1707
1708 DEC Private Mode Set (DECSET)
1709
1710 =item B<< C<ESC [ ? Pm l> >>
1711
1712 DEC Private Mode Reset (DECRST)
1713
1714 =item B<< C<ESC [ ? Pm r> >>
1715
1716 Restore previously saved DEC Private Mode Values.
1717
1718 =item B<< C<ESC [ ? Pm s> >>
1719
1720 Save DEC Private Mode Values.
1721
1722 =item B<< C<ESC [ ? Pm t> >>
1723
1724 Toggle DEC Private Mode Values (rxvt extension). I<where>
1725
1726 =over 4
1727
1728 =item B<< C<Pm = 1> >> (DECCKM)
1729
1730 =begin table
1731
1732         B<< C<h> >>     Application Cursor Keys
1733         B<< C<l> >>     Normal Cursor Keys
1734
1735 =end table
1736
1737 =item B<< C<Pm = 2> >> (ANSI/VT52 mode)
1738
1739 =begin table
1740
1741         B<< C<h> >>     Enter VT52 mode
1742         B<< C<l> >>     Enter VT52 mode
1743
1744 =end table
1745
1746 =item B<< C<Pm = 3> >>
1747
1748 =begin table
1749
1750         B<< C<h> >>     132 Column Mode (DECCOLM)
1751         B<< C<l> >>     80 Column Mode (DECCOLM)
1752
1753 =end table
1754
1755 =item B<< C<Pm = 4> >>
1756
1757 =begin table
1758
1759         B<< C<h> >>     Smooth (Slow) Scroll (DECSCLM)
1760         B<< C<l> >>     Jump (Fast) Scroll (DECSCLM)
1761
1762 =end table
1763
1764 =item B<< C<Pm = 5> >>
1765
1766 =begin table
1767
1768         B<< C<h> >>     Reverse Video (DECSCNM)
1769         B<< C<l> >>     Normal Video (DECSCNM)
1770
1771 =end table
1772
1773 =item B<< C<Pm = 6> >>
1774
1775 =begin table
1776
1777         B<< C<h> >>     Origin Mode (DECOM)
1778         B<< C<l> >>     Normal Cursor Mode (DECOM)
1779
1780 =end table
1781
1782 =item B<< C<Pm = 7> >>
1783
1784 =begin table
1785
1786         B<< C<h> >>     Wraparound Mode (DECAWM)
1787         B<< C<l> >>     No Wraparound Mode (DECAWM)
1788
1789 =end table
1790
1791 =item B<< C<Pm = 8> >> I<unimplemented>
1792
1793 =begin table
1794
1795         B<< C<h> >>     Auto-repeat Keys (DECARM)
1796         B<< C<l> >>     No Auto-repeat Keys (DECARM)
1797
1798 =end table
1799
1800 =item B<< C<Pm = 9> >> X10 XTerm
1801
1802 =begin table
1803
1804         B<< C<h> >>     Send Mouse X & Y on button press.
1805         B<< C<l> >>     No mouse reporting.
1806
1807 =end table
1808
1809 =item B<< C<Pm = 25> >>
1810
1811 =begin table
1812
1813         B<< C<h> >>     Visible cursor {cnorm/cvvis}
1814         B<< C<l> >>     Invisible cursor {civis}
1815
1816 =end table
1817
1818 =item B<< C<Pm = 30> >>
1819
1820 =begin table
1821
1822         B<< C<h> >>     scrollBar visible
1823         B<< C<l> >>     scrollBar invisible
1824
1825 =end table
1826
1827 =item B<< C<Pm = 35> >> (B<rxvt>)
1828
1829 =begin table
1830
1831         B<< C<h> >>     Allow XTerm Shift+key sequences
1832         B<< C<l> >>     Disallow XTerm Shift+key sequences
1833
1834 =end table
1835
1836 =item B<< C<Pm = 38> >> I<unimplemented>
1837
1838 Enter Tektronix Mode (DECTEK)
1839
1840 =item B<< C<Pm = 40> >>
1841
1842 =begin table
1843
1844         B<< C<h> >>     Allow 80/132 Mode
1845         B<< C<l> >>     Disallow 80/132 Mode
1846
1847 =end table
1848
1849 =item B<< C<Pm = 44> >> I<unimplemented>
1850
1851 =begin table
1852
1853         B<< C<h> >>     Turn On Margin Bell
1854         B<< C<l> >>     Turn Off Margin Bell
1855
1856 =end table
1857
1858 =item B<< C<Pm = 45> >> I<unimplemented>
1859
1860 =begin table
1861
1862         B<< C<h> >>     Reverse-wraparound Mode
1863         B<< C<l> >>     No Reverse-wraparound Mode
1864
1865 =end table
1866
1867 =item B<< C<Pm = 46> >> I<unimplemented>
1868
1869 =item B<< C<Pm = 47> >>
1870
1871 =begin table
1872
1873         B<< C<h> >>     Use Alternate Screen Buffer
1874         B<< C<l> >>     Use Normal Screen Buffer
1875
1876 =end table
1877
1878 X<Priv66>
1879
1880 =item B<< C<Pm = 66> >>
1881
1882 =begin table
1883
1884         B<< C<h> >>     Application Keypad (DECPAM) == C<ESC =>
1885         B<< C<l> >>     Normal Keypad (DECPNM) == C<< ESC > >>
1886
1887 =end table
1888
1889 =item B<< C<Pm = 67> >>
1890
1891 =begin table
1892
1893         B<< C<h> >>     Backspace key sends B<< C<BS> (DECBKM) >>
1894         B<< C<l> >>     Backspace key sends B<< C<DEL> >>
1895
1896 =end table
1897
1898 =item B<< C<Pm = 1000> >> (X11 XTerm)
1899
1900 =begin table
1901
1902         B<< C<h> >>     Send Mouse X & Y on button press and release.
1903         B<< C<l> >>     No mouse reporting.
1904
1905 =end table
1906
1907 =item B<< C<Pm = 1001> >> (X11 XTerm) I<unimplemented>
1908
1909 =begin table
1910
1911         B<< C<h> >>     Use Hilite Mouse Tracking.
1912         B<< C<l> >>     No mouse reporting.
1913
1914 =end table
1915
1916 =item B<< C<Pm = 1002> >> (X11 XTerm)
1917
1918 =begin table
1919
1920         B<< C<h> >>     Send Mouse X & Y on button press and release, and motion with a button pressed.
1921         B<< C<l> >>     No mouse reporting.
1922
1923 =end table
1924
1925 =item B<< C<Pm = 1003> >> (X11 XTerm)
1926
1927 =begin table
1928
1929         B<< C<h> >>     Send Mouse X & Y on button press and release, and motion.
1930         B<< C<l> >>     No mouse reporting.
1931
1932 =end table
1933
1934 =item B<< C<Pm = 1010> >> (B<rxvt>)
1935
1936 =begin table
1937
1938         B<< C<h> >>     Don't scroll to bottom on TTY output
1939         B<< C<l> >>     Scroll to bottom on TTY output
1940
1941 =end table
1942
1943 =item B<< C<Pm = 1011> >> (B<rxvt>)
1944
1945 =begin table
1946
1947         B<< C<h> >>     Scroll to bottom when a key is pressed
1948         B<< C<l> >>     Don't scroll to bottom when a key is pressed
1949
1950 =end table
1951
1952 =item B<< C<Pm = 1021> >> (B<rxvt>)
1953
1954 =begin table
1955
1956         B<< C<h> >>     Bold/italic implies high intensity (see option B<-is>)
1957         B<< C<l> >>     Font styles have no effect on intensity (Compile styles)
1958
1959 =end table
1960
1961 =item B<< C<Pm = 1047> >>
1962
1963 =begin table
1964
1965         B<< C<h> >>     Use Alternate Screen Buffer
1966         B<< C<l> >>     Use Normal Screen Buffer - clear Alternate Screen Buffer if returning from it
1967
1968 =end table
1969
1970 =item B<< C<Pm = 1048> >>
1971
1972 =begin table
1973
1974         B<< C<h> >>     Save cursor position
1975         B<< C<l> >>     Restore cursor position
1976
1977 =end table
1978
1979 =item B<< C<Pm = 1049> >>
1980
1981 =begin table
1982
1983         B<< C<h> >>     Use Alternate Screen Buffer - clear Alternate Screen Buffer if switching to it
1984         B<< C<l> >>     Use Normal Screen Buffer
1985
1986 =end table
1987
1988 =item B<< C<Pm = 2004> >>
1989
1990 =begin table
1991
1992         B<< C<h> >>     Enable bracketed paste mode - prepend / append to the pasted text the control sequences C<ESC [ 200 ~> / C<ESC [ 201 ~>
1993         B<< C<l> >>     Disable bracketed paste mode
1994
1995 =end table
1996
1997 =back
1998
1999 =back
2000
2001 X<XTerm>
2002
2003 =head2 XTerm Operating System Commands
2004
2005 =over 4
2006
2007 =item B<< C<ESC ] Ps;Pt ST> >>
2008
2009 Set XTerm Parameters. 8-bit ST: 0x9c, 7-bit ST sequence: ESC \ (0x1b,
2010 0x5c), backwards compatible terminator BEL (0x07) is also accepted. any
2011 B<octet> can be escaped by prefixing it with SYN (0x16, ^V).
2012
2013 =begin table
2014
2015         B<< C<Ps = 0> >>        Change Icon Name and Window Title to B<< C<Pt> >>
2016         B<< C<Ps = 1> >>        Change Icon Name to B<< C<Pt> >>
2017         B<< C<Ps = 2> >>        Change Window Title to B<< C<Pt> >>
2018         B<< C<Ps = 3> >>        If B<< C<Pt> >> starts with a B<< C<?> >>, query the (STRING) property of the window and return it. If B<< C<Pt> >> contains a B<< C<=> >>, set the named property to the given value, else delete the specified property.
2019         B<< C<Ps = 4> >>        B<< C<Pt> >> is a semi-colon separated sequence of one or more semi-colon separated B<number>/B<name> pairs, where B<number> is an index to a colour and B<name> is the name of a colour. Each pair causes the B<number>ed colour to be changed to B<name>. Numbers 0-7 corresponds to low-intensity (normal) colours and 8-15 corresponds to high-intensity colours. 0=black, 1=red, 2=green, 3=yellow, 4=blue, 5=magenta, 6=cyan, 7=white
2020         B<< C<Ps = 10> >>       Change colour of text foreground to B<< C<Pt> >>
2021         B<< C<Ps = 11> >>       Change colour of text background to B<< C<Pt> >>
2022         B<< C<Ps = 12> >>       Change colour of text cursor foreground to B<< C<Pt> >>
2023         B<< C<Ps = 13> >>       Change colour of mouse foreground to B<< C<Pt> >>
2024         B<< C<Ps = 17> >>       Change colour of highlight characters to B<< C<Pt> >>
2025         B<< C<Ps = 18> >>       Change colour of bold characters to B<< C<Pt> >> [deprecated, see 706]
2026         B<< C<Ps = 19> >>       Change colour of underlined characters to B<< C<Pt> >> [deprecated, see 707]
2027         B<< C<Ps = 20> >>       Change background pixmap parameters (see section BACKGROUND IMAGE) (Compile AfterImage).
2028         B<< C<Ps = 39> >>       Change default foreground colour to B<< C<Pt> >>. [deprecated, use 10]
2029         B<< C<Ps = 46> >>       Change Log File to B<< C<Pt> >> I<unimplemented>
2030         B<< C<Ps = 49> >>       Change default background colour to B<< C<Pt> >>. [deprecated, use 11]
2031         B<< C<Ps = 50> >>       Set fontset to B<< C<Pt> >>, with the following special values of B<< C<Pt> >> (B<rxvt>) B<< C<#+n> >> change up B<< C<n> >> B<< C<#-n> >> change down B<< C<n> >> if B<< C<n> >> is missing of 0, a value of 1 is used I<empty> change to font0 B<< C<n> >> change to font B<< C<n> >>
2032         B<< C<Ps = 55> >>       Log all scrollback buffer and all of screen to B<< C<Pt> >> [disabled]
2033         B<< C<Ps = 701> >>      Change current locale to B<< C<Pt> >>, or, if B<< C<Pt> >> is B<< C<?> >>, return the current locale (Compile frills).
2034         B<< C<Ps = 702> >>      Request version if B<< C<Pt> >> is B<< C<?> >>, returning C<rxvt-unicode>, the resource name, the major and minor version numbers, e.g. C<ESC ] 702 ; rxvt-unicode ; urxvt ; 7 ; 4 ST>.
2035         B<< C<Ps = 704> >>      Change colour of italic characters to B<< C<Pt> >>
2036         B<< C<Ps = 705> >>      Change background pixmap tint colour to B<< C<Pt> >> (Compile transparency).
2037         B<< C<Ps = 706> >>      Change colour of bold characters to B<< C<Pt> >>
2038         B<< C<Ps = 707> >>      Change colour of underlined characters to B<< C<Pt> >>
2039         B<< C<Ps = 708> >>      Change colour of the border to B<< C<Pt> >>
2040         B<< C<Ps = 710> >>      Set normal fontset to B<< C<Pt> >>. Same as C<Ps = 50>.
2041         B<< C<Ps = 711> >>      Set bold fontset to B<< C<Pt> >>. Similar to C<Ps = 50> (Compile styles).
2042         B<< C<Ps = 712> >>      Set italic fontset to B<< C<Pt> >>. Similar to C<Ps = 50> (Compile styles).
2043         B<< C<Ps = 713> >>      Set bold-italic fontset to B<< C<Pt> >>. Similar to C<Ps = 50> (Compile styles).
2044         B<< C<Ps = 720> >>      Move viewing window up by B<< C<Pt> >> lines, or clear scrollback buffer if C<Pt = 0> (Compile frills).
2045         B<< C<Ps = 721> >>      Move viewing window down by B<< C<Pt> >> lines, or clear scrollback buffer if C<Pt = 0> (Compile frills).
2046         B<< C<Ps = 777> >>      Call the perl extension with the given string, which should be of the form C<extension:parameters> (Compile perl).
2047
2048 =end table
2049
2050 =back
2051
2052 =head1 BACKGROUND IMAGE
2053
2054 For the BACKGROUND IMAGE XTerm escape sequence B<< C<ESC ] 20 ; Pt ST> >> the value
2055 of B<< C<Pt> >> can be the name of the background image file followed by a
2056 sequence of scaling/positioning commands separated by semi-colons. The
2057 scaling/positioning commands are as follows:
2058
2059 =over 4
2060
2061 =item query scale/position
2062
2063 B<?>
2064
2065 =item change scale and position
2066
2067 B<WxH+X+Y>
2068
2069 B<WxH+X> (== B<WxH+X+X>)
2070
2071 B<WxH> (same as B<WxH+50+50>)
2072
2073 B<W+X+Y> (same as B<WxW+X+Y>)
2074
2075 B<W+X> (same as B<WxW+X+X>)
2076
2077 B<W> (same as B<WxW+50+50>)
2078
2079 =item change position (absolute)
2080
2081 B<=+X+Y>
2082
2083 B<=+X> (same as B<=+X+Y>)
2084
2085 =item change position (relative)
2086
2087 B<+X+Y>
2088
2089 B<+X> (same as B<+X+Y>)
2090
2091 =item rescale (relative)
2092
2093 B<Wx0> -> B<W *= (W/100)>
2094
2095 B<0xH> -> B<H *= (H/100)>
2096
2097 =back
2098
2099 For example:
2100
2101 =over 4
2102
2103 =item B<\E]20;funky.jpg\a>
2104
2105 load B<funky.jpg> as a tiled image
2106
2107 =item B<\E]20;mona.jpg;100\a>
2108
2109 load B<mona.jpg> with a scaling of 100%
2110
2111 =item B<\E]20;;200;?\a>
2112
2113 rescale the current pixmap to 200% and display the image geometry in
2114 the title
2115
2116 =back
2117
2118 X<Mouse>
2119
2120 =head1 Mouse Reporting
2121
2122 =over 4
2123
2124 =item B<< C<< ESC [ M <b> <x> <y> >> >>
2125
2126 report mouse position
2127
2128 =back
2129
2130 The lower 2 bits of B<< C<< <b> >> >> indicate the button:
2131
2132 =over 4
2133
2134 =item Button = B<< C<< (<b> - SPACE) & 3 >> >>
2135
2136 =begin table
2137
2138         0       Button1 pressed
2139         1       Button2 pressed
2140         2       Button3 pressed
2141         3       button released (X11 mouse report)
2142
2143 =end table
2144
2145 =back
2146
2147 The upper bits of B<< C<< <b> >> >> indicate the modifiers when the
2148 button was pressed and are added together (X11 mouse report only):
2149
2150 =over 4
2151
2152 =item State = B<< C<< (<b> - SPACE) & 60 >> >>
2153
2154 =begin table
2155
2156         4       Shift
2157         8       Meta
2158         16      Control
2159         32      Double Click I<(rxvt extension)>
2160
2161 =end table
2162
2163 Col = B<< C<< <x> - SPACE >> >>
2164
2165 Row = B<< C<< <y> - SPACE >> >>
2166
2167 =back
2168
2169 =head1 Key Codes
2170
2171 X<KeyCodes>
2172
2173 Note: B<Shift> + B<F1>-B<F10> generates B<F11>-B<F20>
2174
2175 For the keypad, use B<Shift> to temporarily override Application-Keypad
2176 setting use B<Num_Lock> to toggle Application-Keypad setting if
2177 B<Num_Lock> is off, toggle Application-Keypad setting. Also note that
2178 values of B<Home>, B<End>, B<Delete> may have been compiled differently on
2179 your system.
2180
2181 =begin table
2182
2183                 B<Normal>       B<Shift>        B<Control>      B<Ctrl+Shift>
2184         Tab     ^I      ESC [ Z ^I      ESC [ Z
2185         BackSpace       ^H      ^?      ^?      ^?
2186         Find    ESC [ 1 ~       ESC [ 1 $       ESC [ 1 ^       ESC [ 1 @
2187         Insert  ESC [ 2 ~       I<paste>        ESC [ 2 ^       ESC [ 2 @
2188         Execute ESC [ 3 ~       ESC [ 3 $       ESC [ 3 ^       ESC [ 3 @
2189         Select  ESC [ 4 ~       ESC [ 4 $       ESC [ 4 ^       ESC [ 4 @
2190         Prior   ESC [ 5 ~       I<scroll-up>    ESC [ 5 ^       ESC [ 5 @
2191         Next    ESC [ 6 ~       I<scroll-down>  ESC [ 6 ^       ESC [ 6 @
2192         Home    ESC [ 7 ~       ESC [ 7 $       ESC [ 7 ^       ESC [ 7 @
2193         End     ESC [ 8 ~       ESC [ 8 $       ESC [ 8 ^       ESC [ 8 @
2194         Delete  ESC [ 3 ~       ESC [ 3 $       ESC [ 3 ^       ESC [ 3 @
2195         F1      ESC [ 11 ~      ESC [ 23 ~      ESC [ 11 ^      ESC [ 23 ^
2196         F2      ESC [ 12 ~      ESC [ 24 ~      ESC [ 12 ^      ESC [ 24 ^
2197         F3      ESC [ 13 ~      ESC [ 25 ~      ESC [ 13 ^      ESC [ 25 ^
2198         F4      ESC [ 14 ~      ESC [ 26 ~      ESC [ 14 ^      ESC [ 26 ^
2199         F5      ESC [ 15 ~      ESC [ 28 ~      ESC [ 15 ^      ESC [ 28 ^
2200         F6      ESC [ 17 ~      ESC [ 29 ~      ESC [ 17 ^      ESC [ 29 ^
2201         F7      ESC [ 18 ~      ESC [ 31 ~      ESC [ 18 ^      ESC [ 31 ^
2202         F8      ESC [ 19 ~      ESC [ 32 ~      ESC [ 19 ^      ESC [ 32 ^
2203         F9      ESC [ 20 ~      ESC [ 33 ~      ESC [ 20 ^      ESC [ 33 ^
2204         F10     ESC [ 21 ~      ESC [ 34 ~      ESC [ 21 ^      ESC [ 34 ^
2205         F11     ESC [ 23 ~      ESC [ 23 $      ESC [ 23 ^      ESC [ 23 @
2206         F12     ESC [ 24 ~      ESC [ 24 $      ESC [ 24 ^      ESC [ 24 @
2207         F13     ESC [ 25 ~      ESC [ 25 $      ESC [ 25 ^      ESC [ 25 @
2208         F14     ESC [ 26 ~      ESC [ 26 $      ESC [ 26 ^      ESC [ 26 @
2209         F15 (Help)      ESC [ 28 ~      ESC [ 28 $      ESC [ 28 ^      ESC [ 28 @
2210         F16 (Menu)      ESC [ 29 ~      ESC [ 29 $      ESC [ 29 ^      ESC [ 29 @
2211         F17     ESC [ 31 ~      ESC [ 31 $      ESC [ 31 ^      ESC [ 31 @
2212         F18     ESC [ 32 ~      ESC [ 32 $      ESC [ 32 ^      ESC [ 32 @
2213         F19     ESC [ 33 ~      ESC [ 33 $      ESC [ 33 ^      ESC [ 33 @
2214         F20     ESC [ 34 ~      ESC [ 34 $      ESC [ 34 ^      ESC [ 34 @
2215                                         B<Application>
2216         Up      ESC [ A ESC [ a ESC O a ESC O A
2217         Down    ESC [ B ESC [ b ESC O b ESC O B
2218         Right   ESC [ C ESC [ c ESC O c ESC O C
2219         Left    ESC [ D ESC [ d ESC O d ESC O D
2220         KP_Enter        ^M                      ESC O M
2221         KP_F1   ESC O P                 ESC O P
2222         KP_F2   ESC O Q                 ESC O Q
2223         KP_F3   ESC O R                 ESC O R
2224         KP_F4   ESC O S                 ESC O S
2225         XK_KP_Multiply  *                       ESC O j
2226         XK_KP_Add       +                       ESC O k
2227         XK_KP_Separator ,                       ESC O l
2228         XK_KP_Subtract  -                       ESC O m
2229         XK_KP_Decimal   .                       ESC O n
2230         XK_KP_Divide    /                       ESC O o
2231         XK_KP_0 0                       ESC O p
2232         XK_KP_1 1                       ESC O q
2233         XK_KP_2 2                       ESC O r
2234         XK_KP_3 3                       ESC O s
2235         XK_KP_4 4                       ESC O t
2236         XK_KP_5 5                       ESC O u
2237         XK_KP_6 6                       ESC O v
2238         XK_KP_7 7                       ESC O w
2239         XK_KP_8 8                       ESC O x
2240         XK_KP_9 9                       ESC O y
2241
2242 =end table
2243
2244 =head1 CONFIGURE OPTIONS
2245
2246 General hint: if you get compile errors, then likely your configuration
2247 hasn't been tested well. Either try with C<--enable-everything> or use
2248 the default configuration (i.e. no C<--enable-xxx> or C<--disable-xxx>
2249 switches). Of course, you should always report when a combination doesn't
2250 work, so it can be fixed. Marc Lehmann <rxvt@schmorp.de>.
2251
2252 All
2253
2254 =over 4
2255
2256 =item --enable-everything
2257
2258 Add (or remove) support for all non-multichoice options listed in
2259 C<./configure --help>, except for C<--enable-assert>.
2260
2261 You can specify this and then disable options you do not like by
2262 I<following> this with the appropriate C<--disable-...> arguments,
2263 or you can start with a minimal configuration by specifying
2264 C<--disable-everything> and than adding just the C<--enable-...> arguments
2265 you want.
2266
2267 =item --enable-256-color (default: off)
2268
2269 Add support for 256 colors.
2270
2271 =item --enable-xft (default: enabled)
2272
2273 Add support for Xft (anti-aliases, among others) fonts. Xft fonts are
2274 slower and require lots of memory, but as long as you don't use them, you
2275 don't pay for them.
2276
2277 =item --enable-font-styles (default: on)
2278
2279 Add support for B<bold>, I<italic> and B<< I<bold italic> >> font
2280 styles. The fonts can be set manually or automatically.
2281
2282 =item --with-codesets=NAME,... (default: all)
2283
2284 Compile in support for additional codeset (encoding) groups (C<eu>, C<vn>
2285 are always compiled in, which includes most 8-bit character sets). These
2286 codeset tables are used for driving X11 core fonts, they are not required
2287 for Xft fonts, although having them compiled in lets rxvt-unicode choose
2288 replacement fonts more intelligently. Compiling them in will make your
2289 binary bigger (all of together cost about 700kB), but it doesn't increase
2290 memory usage unless you use a font requiring one of these encodings.
2291
2292 =begin table
2293
2294         all     all available codeset groups
2295         zh      common chinese encodings
2296         zh_ext  rarely used but very big chinese encodings
2297         jp      common japanese encodings
2298         jp_ext  rarely used but big japanese encodings
2299         kr      korean encodings
2300
2301 =end table
2302
2303 =item --enable-xim (default: on)
2304
2305 Add support for XIM (X Input Method) protocol. This allows using
2306 alternative input methods (e.g. kinput2) and will also correctly
2307 set up the input for people using dead keys or compose keys.
2308
2309 =item --enable-unicode3 (default: off)
2310
2311 Recommended to stay off unless you really need non-BMP characters.
2312
2313 Enable direct support for displaying unicode codepoints above
2314 65535 (the basic multilingual page). This increases storage
2315 requirements per character from 2 to 4 bytes. X11 fonts do not yet
2316 support these extra characters, but Xft does.
2317
2318 Please note that rxvt-unicode can store unicode code points >65535
2319 even without this flag, but the number of such characters is
2320 limited to a few thousand (shared with combining characters,
2321 see next switch), and right now rxvt-unicode cannot display them
2322 (input/output and cut&paste still work, though).
2323
2324 =item --enable-combining (default: on)
2325
2326 Enable automatic composition of combining characters into
2327 composite characters. This is required for proper viewing of text
2328 where accents are encoded as separate unicode characters. This is
2329 done by using precomposited characters when available or creating
2330 new pseudo-characters when no precomposed form exists.
2331
2332 Without --enable-unicode3, the number of additional precomposed
2333 characters is somewhat limited (the 6400 private use characters will be
2334 (ab-)used). With --enable-unicode3, no practical limit exists.
2335
2336 This option will also enable storage (but not display) of characters
2337 beyond plane 0 (>65535) when --enable-unicode3 was not specified.
2338
2339 The combining table also contains entries for arabic presentation forms,
2340 but these are not currently used. Bug me if you want these to be used (and
2341 tell me how these are to be used...).
2342
2343 =item --enable-fallback(=CLASS) (default: Rxvt)
2344
2345 When reading resource settings, also read settings for class CLASS. To
2346 disable resource fallback use --disable-fallback.
2347
2348 =item --with-res-name=NAME (default: urxvt)
2349
2350 Use the given name as default application name when
2351 reading resources. Specify --with-res-name=rxvt to replace rxvt.
2352
2353 =item --with-res-class=CLASS (default: URxvt)
2354
2355 Use the given class as default application class
2356 when reading resources. Specify --with-res-class=Rxvt to replace
2357 rxvt.
2358
2359 =item --enable-utmp (default: on)
2360
2361 Write user and tty to utmp file (used by programs like F<w>) at
2362 start of rxvt execution and delete information when rxvt exits.
2363
2364 =item --enable-wtmp (default: on)
2365
2366 Write user and tty to wtmp file (used by programs like F<last>) at
2367 start of rxvt execution and write logout when rxvt exits.  This
2368 option requires --enable-utmp to also be specified.
2369
2370 =item --enable-lastlog (default: on)
2371
2372 Write user and tty to lastlog file (used by programs like
2373 F<lastlogin>) at start of rxvt execution.  This option requires
2374 --enable-utmp to also be specified.
2375
2376 =item --enable-afterimage (default: on)
2377
2378 Add support for libAfterImage to be used for transparency and background
2379 images. It adds support for many file formats including JPG, PNG,
2380 SVG, TIFF, GIF, XPM, BMP, ICO, XCF, TGA and AfterStep image XML
2381 (L<http://www.afterstep.org/visualdoc.php?show=asimagexml>).
2382
2383 This option also adds such eye candy as blending an image over the root
2384 background, as well as dynamic scaling and bluring of background images.
2385
2386 Note that with this option enabled, @@RXVT_NAME@@'s memory footprint might
2387 increase by a few megabytes even if no extra features are used (mostly due
2388 to third-party libraries used by libAI). Memory footprint may somewhat be
2389 lowered if libAfterImage is configured without support for SVG.
2390
2391 =item --enable-transparency (default: on)
2392
2393 Add support for backgrounds, creating illusion of transparency in the term.
2394
2395 =item --enable-fading (default: on)
2396
2397 Add support for fading the text when focus is lost.
2398
2399 =item --enable-rxvt-scroll (default: on)
2400
2401 Add support for the original rxvt scrollbar.
2402
2403 =item --enable-next-scroll (default: on)
2404
2405 Add support for a NeXT-like scrollbar.
2406
2407 =item --enable-xterm-scroll (default: on)
2408
2409 Add support for an Xterm-like scrollbar.
2410
2411 =item --disable-backspace-key
2412
2413 Removes any handling of the backspace key by us - let the X server do it.
2414
2415 =item --disable-delete-key
2416
2417 Removes any handling of the delete key by us - let the X server
2418 do it.
2419
2420 =item --disable-resources
2421
2422 Removes any support for resource checking.
2423
2424 =item --disable-swapscreen
2425
2426 Remove support for secondary/swap screen.
2427
2428 =item --enable-frills (default: on)
2429
2430 Add support for many small features that are not essential but nice to
2431 have. Normally you want this, but for very small binaries you may want to
2432 disable this.
2433
2434 A non-exhaustive list of features enabled by C<--enable-frills> (possibly
2435 in combination with other switches) is:
2436
2437   MWM-hints
2438   EWMH-hints (pid, utf8 names) and protocols (ping)
2439   urgency hint
2440   separate underline colour (-underlineColor)
2441   settable border widths and borderless switch (-w, -b, -bl)
2442   visual depth selection (-depth)
2443   settable extra linespacing /-lsp)
2444   iso-14755 5.1 (basic) support
2445   tripleclickwords (-tcw)
2446   settable insecure mode (-insecure)
2447   keysym remapping support
2448   cursor blinking and underline cursor (-bc, -uc)
2449   XEmbed support (-embed)
2450   user-pty (-pty-fd)
2451   hold on exit (-hold)
2452   compile in built-in block graphics
2453   skip builtin block graphics (-sbg)
2454   separate highlightcolor support (-hc)
2455
2456 It also enables some non-essential features otherwise disabled, such as:
2457
2458   some round-trip time optimisations
2459   nearest color allocation on pseudocolor screens
2460   UTF8_STRING support for selection
2461   sgr modes 90..97 and 100..107
2462   backindex and forwardindex escape sequences
2463   view change/zero scrollback escape sequences
2464   locale switching escape sequence
2465   window op and some xterm/OSC escape sequences
2466   rectangular selections
2467   trailing space removal for selections
2468   verbose X error handling
2469
2470 =item --enable-iso14755 (default: on)
2471
2472 Enable extended ISO 14755 support (see @@RXVT_NAME@@(1)).
2473 Basic support (section 5.1) is enabled by C<--enable-frills>, while
2474 support for 5.2, 5.3 and 5.4 is enabled with this switch.
2475
2476 =item --enable-keepscrolling (default: on)
2477
2478 Add support for continual scrolling of the display when you hold
2479 the mouse button down on a scrollbar arrow.
2480
2481 =item --enable-selectionscrolling (default: on)
2482
2483 Add support for scrolling when the selection moves to the top or
2484 bottom of the screen.
2485
2486 =item --enable-mousewheel (default: on)
2487
2488 Add support for scrolling via mouse wheel or buttons 4 & 5.
2489
2490 =item --enable-slipwheeling (default: on)
2491
2492 Add support for continual scrolling (using the mouse wheel as an
2493 accelerator) while the control key is held down.  This option
2494 requires --enable-mousewheel to also be specified.
2495
2496 =item --enable-smart-resize (default: off)
2497
2498 Add smart growth/shrink behaviour when resizing.
2499 This should keep the window corner which is closest to a corner of
2500 the screen in a fixed position.
2501
2502 =item --enable-text-blink (default: on)
2503
2504 Add support for blinking text.
2505
2506 =item --enable-pointer-blank (default: on)
2507
2508 Add support to have the pointer disappear when typing or inactive.
2509
2510 =item --enable-perl (default: on)
2511
2512 Enable an embedded perl interpreter. See the B<@@RXVT_NAME@@perl(3)>
2513 manpage for more info on this feature, or the files in F<src/perl/>
2514 for the extensions that are installed by default.
2515 The perl interpreter that is used can be specified via the C<PERL>
2516 environment variable when running configure. Even when compiled in,
2517 perl will I<not> be initialised when all extensions have been disabled
2518 C<-pe "" --perl-ext-common "">, so it should be safe to enable from a
2519 resource standpoint.
2520
2521 =item --enable-assert (default: off)
2522
2523 Enables the assertions in the code, normally disabled. This switch is only
2524 useful when developing rxvt-unicode.
2525
2526 =item --with-afterimage-config=DIR
2527
2528 Look for the libAfterImage config script in DIR.
2529
2530 =item --with-name=NAME (default: urxvt)
2531
2532 Set the basename for the installed binaries, resulting
2533 in C<urxvt>, C<urxvtd> etc.). Specify C<--with-name=rxvt> to replace with
2534 C<rxvt>.
2535
2536 =item --with-term=NAME (default: rxvt-unicode)
2537
2538 Change the environmental variable for the terminal to NAME.
2539
2540 =item --with-terminfo=PATH
2541
2542 Change the environmental variable for the path to the terminfo tree to
2543 PATH.
2544
2545 =item --with-x
2546
2547 Use the X Window System (pretty much default, eh?).
2548
2549 =back
2550
2551 =head1 AUTHORS
2552
2553 Marc Lehmann <rxvt@schmorp.de> converted this document to pod and
2554 reworked it from the original Rxvt documentation, which was done by Geoff
2555 Wing <gcw@pobox.com>, who in turn used the XTerm documentation and other
2556 sources.
2557